IJT 171

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03 December 2014 by IJT

Michael Scharf, interim dean of Case Western Reserve University School of Law, is an expert on maintaining control of war crimes trials whose video on the subject has been included in the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. IJT asked him to share insights about the recent decision of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to release Serbian firebrand politician Vojislav Seselj.

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Supporters await the arrival of Vojislav Seselj  at Belgrade airport after his provisional release in November 2014
03 December 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Following the decision to provisionally release Serbian firebrand politician Vojislav Seselj on health grounds, pending judgment, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has come under scrutiny, with many fearing that the handling of this case could cast a shadow over the court’s legacy.

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03 December 2014 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The trial of 21 former political police agents of Chad’s ex-president Hissène Habré was adjourned last week after just a handful of hearings. The reason for delay is an on-going lawyers’ strike over a pay dispute with the government.

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Thomas Lubanga at his appeals verdict (Flickr/ICC-CPI)
03 December 2014 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This week the International Criminal Court (ICC), on appeal, upheld its first-ever verdict. However, the decision once again raises questions about the work of the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) and the accused’s right to a fair trial.

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03 December 2014 by Paul Vrieze, Rangoon (Myanmar)

A recent independent report finds three senior military officers could be held responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed by Myanmar army personnel during an offensive against ethnic armed groups in the east of the country.

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STL Courtroom in The Hague
03 December 2014 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

“A sea change” was the phrase repeated by defence teams at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) to decry what they saw as a radical, unexpected departure from the prosecution’s case against five Hezbollah members accused of operating the assassination of former prime minister Rafik Hariri in February 2005.

issue
03 December 2014

 Links to articles and PDF of IJT issue number 171.