Ieng Thirith

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the Holocaust, women conducted medical experiments and guarded concentration camps. During the Rwandan genocide, they managed roadblocks and burned buildings with people inside. Women have been involved in almost every type of mass violence, a recent Dutch study has found. Still, the number who are prosecuted and convicted is significantly lower than men.

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
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02 February 2011 by Jared Ferrie

Three former Khmer Rouge leaders asked a UN-backed international tribunal on Monday to free them as they await the long anticipated, but yet unscheduled, trial. 

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26 October 2011 by Robert Carmichael

The elderly defendants deny charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. They stand accused of responsibility for the deaths of up to 2.2 million people during the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-79 rule. Tribunal spokesman Lars Olsen explained the significance of Case 002, as it is known in court parlance.

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21 June 2011 by Jared Ferrie

Thirty-two years after the fall of one of the 20th century’s bloodiest regimes, a tribunal in Cambodia will begin trying the four most senior Khmer Rouge leaders still alive. But the trial commences under a cloud of controversy, with observers questioning the UN-backed court’s independence.

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23 July 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée and Chheang Bopha

On July 18, the prosecutors communicated their introductory submission to the investigating judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) responsible for trying former Khmer Rouge leaders. Five of them are suspected of having "committed, aided and abetted, or borne superior responsibility" for 25 separate acts of "murder, torture, forcible transfer, unlawful detention, forced labor, and religious, political, and ethnic persecution." Though their names remain officially confidential before arrest, they have already been cited by observers: Duch, Nuon Chea, Ieng Sary, Khieu Samphan and Ieng Thirith.

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19 November 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

Less than four months after the prosecutors in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) submitted five names to the investigating judges, four of the suspects are behind bars and the fifth under surveillance at the hospital. Ieng Sary, 82, former minister of foreign affairs under Pol Pot, and his wife Ieng Thirith, 75, former minister of social action, were arrested in Phnom Penh on November 12.