ICTY

article
26 June 2006 by Massimo Moratti and Berber Hettinga

Ten years after being indicted, all the persons charged by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) for crimes committed in Foca in 1992 are now behind bars. The last defendant to be tried, Dragan Zelenovic, was arrested in Siberia in August 2005 and transferred to The Hague on June 8. After much controversy between the ICTY and Russia, Zelenovic had to stopover in Sarajevo, which is where the ICTY will probably want to return him.

article
22 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From February 28 to May 9, the fifteen judges of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague listened to oral arguments from the parties in the genocide case that Bosnia-Herzegovina brought in March 1993 against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY), which became Serbia and Montenegro in 2003 and then simply Serbia after the May 21 yes vote on the referendum on Montenegro's independence. The ICJ is expected to issue a decision by year end. If convicted, Serbia could have to pay several billion dollars to its neighbor. This ruling represents more than just the first time that a State has been prosecuted for genocide. The Court in this case must render a decision on essentially two main points: does the ICJ have jurisdiction in this matter; and did the FRY commit genocide in Bosnia?

article
24 April 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

When Dutch ad hoc defence counsel Tjarda van der Spoel, who was assigned to the DRC case on August 1, 2005, arrived at the ICC building in The Hague, he was not too sure what his role would be. He had to hand in his passport to get an ICC badge and was accompanied throughout the building by a security guard. He did not have a room where he could hang his coat and put on his robe. For reasons of confidentiality he was not allowed to electronically file submissions from outside the building. But, Van der Spoel told IJT, "everybody I met in the huge white building on Maanweg was friendly enough and willing to cooperate."

article
04 December 2006 by Maria Kolesnikova

The Federation of Russia maintains verbal support for the International Criminal Court (ICC) and still considers ratification of the Rome Statute to be its "strategic goal." Yet, Moscow says it needs to adapt its legislation and to monitor the court's operation before it can ratify the Statute. However, the political will to ratify has been waning in the past few years. Moreover, as the conflict in Chechnya looms over the debate, Russia foresees more losses than gains from joining the ICC.

article
24 July 2006 by Drago Hedl

On July 17, an investigation was opened into Branimir Glavas, one of the most influential Croatian politicians in 15 years. A long-term member of Parliament, general in the Croatian army and one of the founders of the Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ), the party of former Croatian President Franjo Tudjman, Glavas is charged with committing war crimes against Serbian civilians from 1991-1992 while he was in charge of defending Osijek, the fourth largest city in Croatia. He may not take the fall alone.

article
06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".

article
09 October 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On September 27, sixty-one year old Momcilo Krajisnik, president of the Assembly of Bosnian Serbs from 1991-1995, was sentenced to 27 years in prison by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for crimes against humanity. He was acquitted on the charge of genocide. Would the judges have ruled differently if his indictment had covered the Srebrenica massacre - a crime that has led to the only two genocide convictions before the ICTY?

article
06 November 2006 by Pierre Hazan

France's attitude towards international criminal justice is marked by ambiguity. Paris subscribes to a vision of the world in which international humanitarian law is considered a way to curb violence against civilian populations, but at the same time it is wary of an unchecked judicial system that could end up prosecuting French soldiers engaged in areas where it has old and deep-rooted interests.

article
23 October 2006 by Christine Chaumeau

China is keeping a polite distance from international criminal justice. Beijing is hardly disinterested, but China does want to make sure that these new global mechanisms are not going to infringe upon its sovereignty by delving into particularly sensitive cases such as Tibet. 

article
10 July 2006 by Christine Chaumeau

Interview with Marcel Lemonde, co-investigating judge for the Khmer Rouge trials

The Cambodian Extraordinary Chambers, which were established to try Khmer Rouge leaders, officially began working on July 10. Marcel Lemonde, who stepped down as presiding judge of a section of the Paris court of appeal to become co-investigating judge, was sworn in on July 3 in Phnom Penh.

Pages