ICTY

article
06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

article
04 October 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

The sensitive issue of cooperation between Serbia and the ICTY is on the agenda in a meeting on 4 October between the prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Carla del Ponte and Serbian president Boris Tadic, accompanied by his prime minister Vojislav Kostunika. Del Ponte's arrival in Belgrade on 1 October coincides with mounting pressure from the international community for Serbia to do more in its power to hand over war criminals, including the ICTY's most wanted fugitive, Ratko Mladic.

article
19 January 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Goldstone, Louise Arbour and Carla Del Ponte served as prosecutors for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The two tribunals shared a prosecutor until 2003. Frederiek de Vlaming completed her dissertation at the University of Amsterdam, analysing how the three prosecutors selected their suspects, focusing mainly on the ICTY.

article
04 October 2004 by Heikelina Verrijn

After arriving at The Hague in 1996, Tihomir Blaskic, a former colonel in the HVO (Croatian Defence Council), told his wife and son it would take three months to defend himself against charges that he had command responsibility for one of the war's most horrendous massacres: the Ahmici massacre in the Lasva Valley in April 1993. On 2 August this year, after a case with more than its share of twists and turns, Blaskic was released after being resentenced on appeal to nine years.

article
07 February 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Slobodan Milosevic sounded almost jubilant when he called two French witnesses, both former UNPROFOR members sympathetic to the suffering of the Serb people. Nurse Eve Crepin's testimony was so general that presiding judge Patrick Robinson dismissed it as "a conversation with a cup of tea on the veranda". But her partner, former army doctor Patrick Barriot, gave evidence that sparked intense questioning from both prosecutors and judges.

article
07 February 2005 by THIERRY CRUVELLIER WITH OUR CORRESPONDENTS IN THE HAGUE AND ARUSHA

The 31 December 2004 marked the official end of investigations at the two UN courts for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Thus, it is now possible to make a preliminary accounting of the Tribunal's records of indictments.

article
14 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

There is no doubt in the minds of donors backing the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY): all trials must be completed by 2008. The ICTY prosecutor has now seriously begun tackling the process of transferring cases to local courts, with 8 requests for transferral involving 16 accused submitted to the judges.

article
14 March 2005 by Laurent Abadie

The Prime Minister of Kosovo, Ramush Haradinaj, who is accused of crimes against humanity and of violating the laws and customs of war, is the first serving politician to be indicted by the ICTY since the ex-Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic. A former commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), Haradinaj was elected by parliament on 3 December to serve in the UN-administered province. On 8 March, he resigned, preferring to face the UN court "as a common citizen".

article
10 October 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For the last five weeks, at Slobodan Milosevic's invitation, the ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj, former opposition leader and deputy prime minister of Serbia during the war in the former Yugoslavia, has testified in his defence. Since 23 August, Seselj, who is also accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), has presented as facts opinions previously expressed by Milosevic. When the judges asked for evidence, Seselj replied that it existed but that he did not have it.

article
12 September 2005 by Massimo Moratti and Berber Hettinga

It could be called the third generation of international justice: after the UN's international courts for former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Rwanda, and the mixed model of Sierra Leone, the newest and most eagerly-awaited experience - outside the International Criminal Court in The Hague - has its headquarters in Sarajevo. The Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) War Crimes Chamber is a semi-international court housed on the premises of the BiH state court, the highest court in the country since the 1995 peace accords. Ten years after the end of the war, the chamber is about to open its first trial on 14 September.

Pages