ICTY

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05 May 2010 by Heikelina Verrijn

International judges and prosecutors claim to do their utmost to ensure that the practice of international criminal law satisfies fundamental principles. In practice, however, those principles often take second place to notions of human and humanitarian rights. 

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16 February 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

For decades, international lawyers have wrangled over the question - What is terrorism? Is it an act designed to spread terror? Does it have a political motive? Does it involve an attack on a few people or alot of people? Since 1914, philosophers have pondered whether the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Sarajevo can be classified as an ‘act of terror’. More recently, the September 11 attacks in the US, have brought the issue of international terrorism to the forefront of debate, and with it the question of its very definition. 

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25 May 2011 by Nidzara Ahmetasevic

The Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina is safe from attack by the Bosnian Serb President Milorad Dodik, following a deal EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton achieved with the Bosnian Serb leadership on 13 May.

At the end of this month, EU foreign ministers will discuss Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

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20 July 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Karegyesa leads the prosecutions at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), which is finalising its mandate. 

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A medical examining room at the ICTY (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
21 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The on-going controversy over the provisional release of Serbian ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj [IJT-179] from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has recast the spotlight on how courts deal with ailing accused. It also begets a fundamental question: what determines if someone is fit to stand trial?

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Supporters await the arrival of Vojislav Seselj at Belgrade airport after his provisional release in November 2014 (Photo: Joost van Egmond)
07 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The Yugoslavia tribunal announced a new twist in its drawn-out case against Vojislav Seselj, when the appeals chamber ordered the trial chamber to revoke the provisional release of the firebrand Serbian politician. But it is unclear how the court might be able secure his return.

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24 February 2010 by Sebastian Gottlieb & Vessela Evrova

Austria came under fire earlier this month for refusing asylum to a Serbian man who turned over the infamous “Scorpion tape” to international prosecutors in The Hague.

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10 March 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is scheduled to close at the end of February 2014 and its president, Patrick Robinson, is starting to lay the foundations for the tribunal’s legacy. Judge Robinson spoke to the IJT about what he is doing to preserve the legacy of the court.

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05 October 2011 by Radosa Milutinovic

It was two years ago that judge Patrick Robinson, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), warned in a speech to the UN Security Council that contempt proceedings had a “negative impact on the expeditious progress of trials”.

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14 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is working hard on his defence case from his prison cell in Scheveningen. Since the beginning of his pre-trial proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) 14 months ago, he has filed more than a hundred motions – including one that claims that former United States Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke had promised him immunity from prosecution.

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