ICTY

issue
18 July 2012

Summary and link to PDF of IJT 155.

 

article
03 December 2014 by IJT

Michael Scharf, interim dean of Case Western Reserve University School of Law, is an expert on maintaining control of war crimes trials whose video on the subject has been included in the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. IJT asked him to share insights about the recent decision of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to release Serbian firebrand politician Vojislav Seselj.

article
20 September 2004 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN-STUART

On 15 September, the trial of Slobodan Milosevic was adjourned for a month. After imposing lawyers on the accused and hea- ring only two defence witnesses, the Court was forced into an impasse when dozens of defence witnesses suddenly refused to give evidence in the space of a few days at The Hague.

article
30 November 1999 by ANDRE-MICHEL ESSOUNGOU

“Counsel Degli has committed acts of dishonesty, fraud and deception. These serious breaches of professional ethics justify his withdrawal from the case.” This was the unequivocal tone of the decision taken on 27 October by the administration of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) to dismiss the lawyer representing General Gratien Kabiligi. The radical decision was taken following an ICTY enquiry, which on the face of it looks extremely damaging for the Togolese lawyer. 

article
30 November 1999 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Over the last few weeks, British defence counsels Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins have given the Appeals Chamber of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) the opportunity to straighten out a trial gone awry after the Trial Chamber judges' decision of 3 September 2004 to impose defence counsel upon an unwilling Slobodan Milosevic.

article
07 December 2011 by Radosa Milutinovic

The primary purpose of the retrial of Ramush Haradinaj, as proclaimed by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in its appeal judgement in July, should have been to hear testimonies of two "key" witnesses who proved unwilling to testify in the original trial in 2007. Almost four months into the retrial which started in mid-August, its stated aim has not yet been achieved. 

article
21 December 2011 by Radosa Milutinovic

Bosnian Serb General Ratko Mladic had a habit of meticulously recording every meeting he attended during the former Yugoslavia’s war from 1992-95. His notes may well turn out to be the single most important source of prosecution evidence in the war crimes trials of his Bosnian Serb and Serb allies before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). 

article
04 April 2014 by Radosa Milutinovic, The Hague (The Netherlands)
During a month-long, high-powered legal clash Croatia and Serbia have each accused the other of genocide before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague. 20 years after last artillery salvos announced the end of the former Yugoslavia's bloody breakdown, two of its principal republics continued to wage war, by judicial means. 
article
30 April 2014 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

To date, international tribunals have provided little clarity on life after conviction. Barbora Hola and Joris van Wijk, criminologists at the Center for International Criminal Justice at the Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam, are running the research project “When Justice is Done”(*). They have been looking into the situations of more than 100 prisoners convicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL).

article
11 June 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

Prosecutors in Belgrade like to say that they have prosecuted more people than the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in the past decade. In ten years, the Belgrade war crimes court convicted 56 people among 170 indictees – while the ICTY indicted 161 suspects over twenty years. Although they are low level military officials, paramilitaries and local officials no higher than the level of mayor, given the scant resources and often lack lustre political support for prosecutions, this is no mean feat.

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