ICTR

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21 May 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier and our correspondent in Arusha

From May 28 to June 1, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) will hear closing arguments from the Prosecutor and defense in its most important trial - that involving Colonel Théoneste Bagosora, the former Chef de Cabinet at the Ministry of Defense and the presumed architect of the 1994 genocide. The trial has centered around allegations that Bagosora led a conspiracy that planned the genocide well in advance of the killings. Now, after twelve years of investigation and more than five years of trial, what do we actually know?

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24 September 2007 by our correspondent in Arusha

For nearly seven years, the question of whether to send defendants at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) to Rwandan courts has been the subject of irresolute initiatives, dead-end announcements and political-judicial maneuvering. On September 7, the ICTR prosecutor finally requested that three defendants be transferred to Kigali.

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23 July 2007 by Frank Petit

The July 20th arrest of Wenceslas Munyeshyaka and Laurent Bucyibaruta confirmed that France is indeed reopening certain forgotten Rwandan judicial files, albeit somewhat reluctantly. It has been pushed to do so in part by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), which has issued warrants for the arrest of three Rwandans living in France and accused of having participated in the 1994 genocide. Their files should be transferred from Arusha to Paris shortly.

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03 December 2007 by our correspondent in Arusha

When, on November 28, the appeals judges in the Media trial overruled the convictions based on evidence prior to 1994—the start of the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR)—they seriously undermined the foundation of the prosecutor's thesis regarding conspiracy to commit genocide. This decision may convince him to revise his strategy in the trials currently underway, but it falls too late for the Military trial, in which the ICTR is deliberating in the case of leading defendant Théoneste Bagosora.

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19 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On December 3, the district court of The Hague will hear, on appeal, the request of trial for genocide in the Netherlands of Rwandan Joseph Mpambara, which is supported by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) but at the request of a Dutch prosecutor. In the first instance, the court at The Hague decided, on July 24, that was no basis in national law for a genocide prosecution. The case is a sensitive one for the ICTR, which is working to transfer its cases to national jurisdictions besides Rwanda as part of its completion strategy.

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19 November 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 8, thirteen years ago, the United Nations Security Council created the ICTR to try those primarily responsible for the serious crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994. Representatives of the Arusha tribunal promise it will have finished its first instance trials by the end of 2008, except for one, which will be completed in 2009. Two uncertainties still weigh on the ICTR: its ability to transfer some of the accused to national courts and the 14 fugitives. But most of all, the ICTR continues to mourn its most serious failure: the absence of proceedings against the winners of the war.

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30 June 2010 by Hermione Gee

Peter Erlinder, lead defense counsel for top genocide suspects at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), was released from a Rwandan prison on June 18th. The law professor was charged with genocide denial after questioning the official Rwandan version of the 1994 genocide. Erlinder was detained on May 28th while in Kigali to defend opposition presidential candidate Victoire Ingabire.

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06 October 2010 by Stef Vandeginste

With a successfully completed peace process followed by general elections in the summer of 2010, the case of Burundi seemingly contradicted the conventional wisdom that there can be no peace without justice. In fact, despite a rhetorical commitment to establishing transitional justice mechanisms, no action has so far been undertaken to end impunity for past human rights crimes.

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24 August 2010 by Phil Clark

In the next few weeks, Rwanda will complete the most comprehensive post-conflict justice programme attempted anywhere in the world. Since 2001, 11,000 community-based gacaca courts, overseen by locally-elected judges and barring any participation by lawyers, have prosecuted around 400,000 suspected perpetrators of the 1994 genocide.

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16 June 2010 by Emmanuel Munyarukumbuzi & Linawati Sidharto

While the arrest of US lawyer Peter Erlinder in Rwanda for genocide denial three weeks ago has sparked international outcry, Kigali stands by its actions and denies that it is acting on political grounds.

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