ICTR

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10 April 2006 by Anne-Laure Porée

The outcome of Slobodan Milosevic trial may recur in Cambodia, where the government is delaying setting up the extraordinary chambers to try ex- Khmer Rouge leaders, adopting a strategy that increases the likelihood of these leaders dying before they ever come to trial. The latest holdup - the nomination of judges. On March 7, the UN Secretary-General gave Phnom Penh a list of international judges. Since then, the Supreme Council of Magistracy, presided by King Norodom Sihanouk, has been putting off announcing their nomination and the nomination of the Cambodian judges. Helen Jarvis, head of public affairs at the special court for Cambodia, is invariably insisting that these announcements, which have been promised since the beginning of 2006, will be made "soon." According to her, "It's a matter of weeks."

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08 May 2006 by our correspondent in Arusha

On the foggy day of September 20, 2004, the public gallery at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) was packed. It was the first time that a priest from the powerful Rwandan Catholic church was appearing before the ICTR. However, Father Athanase Seromba kept the crowds waiting. He boycotted the trial for a week to protest the negotiations between the ICTR and Rwanda on transferring cases. On April 27, 2006, his trial ended in a similarly fruitless confrontation, consummating what had seemed to be the unlikely symbolic trial of the Church's role in Rwanda in 1994.

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13 March 2006 by our correspondent in Arusha

In February 2004, André Ntagerura, former government minister, and Emmanuel Bagambiki, former prefect, were acquitted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). Yet they remained in detention during the two-year appeals process. On February 8, 2006, their acquittals were upheld, but they are still under house arrest. No country wants to take in a genocide suspect, even one who has been cleared by an international court.

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25 September 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down three decisions in two weeks. Two of the defendants, a former mayor and a former minister, were acquitted. The third, a former officer, was found guilty of genocide and sentenced to 25 years in prison. However these verdicts are not nearly as striking as the new clear and firm tone some of the judges have adopted.

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04 December 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 17, over eight years after he began an investigation into the April 6, 1994 attack that cost the life of Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and triggered the genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda, French judge Jean-Louis Bruguière requested that arrest warrants be issued against nine high-ranking officers in Rwanda's current military, including the chief of staff and the head of the army. He would also like to see the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) prosecute the current Head of State, Paul Kagame, who is protected in France by presidential immunity. However, the ICTR will likely do nothing.

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11 September 2006 by our correspondent in Arusha

After having tried high-ranking officers, ministers, businessmen, priests, journalists, local officials and militiamen, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is in uncharted waters. On September 11, the most famous rwandese troubadour of his generation will stand trial for genocide. 

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04 February 2007 by our correspondent in Arusha

One of the most important trials before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has again run into difficulty following the withdrawal of a judge for health reasons. Nine years after the arrest of the three defendants—leaders of the former presidential party (MRND) who are among the prime suspects in the 1994 genocide—the trial is unlikely to finish before 2008, the completion date set by the UN Security Council for all ICTR trials.

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05 February 2007 by Franck Petit

"That was a strange kind of trial," whispered a disappointed Rwandan woman who, along with many relatives and supporters of the widow of Rwanda's ex-president, had come to watch her defend herself before the Refugee Appeals Board. It took six long hours of hearings on January 25 for this administrative jurisdiction to decide whether there were "serious reasons to believe" that Agathe Habyarimana had any responsibility in the 1994 genocide.

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04 June 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

On June 11, it will be six years since the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) began the trial for six genocide suspects who come from the Butare region in southern Rwanda. The six Rwandans, whose positions and background were quite different, were joined together to "speed up the proceedings." However, this produced just the opposite effect, and the trial has been dragged out with irreparable consequences. This month, two of the accused will begin their thirteenth year in prison with still no verdict in sight.

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16 April 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan army, will be tried starting April 19 before a court of Rwanda's former colonial power. For the Belgian justice system, this third universal jurisdiction trial for crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994 is the result of twelve years of efforts to try one of those it holds responsible for the murder of ten Belgian UN soldiers on April 7, 1994. For the accused, it is above all the end of a long drawn-out legal process.

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