ICTR

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30 March 2011 by Franck Petit

“We want the people responsible for the genocide found and punished”, declared French President Nicolas Sarkozy on 25 February 2010 in Kigali, Rwanda. The stakes were high. The visit marked the resumption of diplomatic relations between France and Rwanda, three years after allegations against President Paul Kagamé by the French inquiry into the 1994 attack on the then Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana. The visit was also the first by a French head of state since the genocide.

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30 March 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The United States is lending increasing support to international tribunals, including the International Crimes Tribunal established by Bangladesh. While visiting courts in Europe, the US Ambassador-at-large for War Crimes Issues, Stephen Rapp, stopped off in The Hague and spoke to IJT.

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21 June 2004 by our correspondent

Sylvestre Gacumbitsi, the former mayor of Rusumo, Kibungo province (eastern Rwanda), has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for genocide and crimes against humanity (extermination and rape). "Gacumbitsi led the attacks on the Tutsi civilians gathered at the Nyarubuye church and personally took part in these attacks," concludes the judgement, which was delivered on 17 June by Senegalese judge Andrésia Vaz, presiding over trial chamber 3 at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). 

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05 July 2004 by our correspondent

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

In the space of a week, just before the summer recess, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down one life sentence, confirmed a second and heard the parties debate two other appeal verdicts. The four cases all concern Rwandan personalities prosecuted for crimes committed in 1994 in the same region, eastern Kibuye.

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20 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. It was a success for those who feared funding cuts. But many participants bitterly lamented the lack of passion that marked the week's meeting.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

Relations between the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the Rwandan government were the topic of two announcements made by the ICTR prosecutor Hassan Jallow at the end of August.

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19 January 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Goldstone, Louise Arbour and Carla Del Ponte served as prosecutors for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The two tribunals shared a prosecutor until 2003. Frederiek de Vlaming completed her dissertation at the University of Amsterdam, analysing how the three prosecutors selected their suspects, focusing mainly on the ICTY.

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16 February 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The Dutch Parliament is in the process of amending the International Crimes Act (2003) to include genocide, making it easier for the Hague District Court’s War Crimes Chamber to prosecute individuals for war crimes around the world. A conversation with the Chamber’s President, Judge Roel van Rossum.

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21 February 2005 by our correspondent

Last week's deposition by Pauline Nyiramasuhuko's eldest daughter was, at best, a rare illustration of openness in court. Clarisse Ntahobali, one of seven initial witnesses called by the defence, testified using her own name, although the curtains remained closed to hide her face. She began by helping to sketch out the educational and professional career of her mother, the only woman to be indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

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