ICC

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Bosco Ntaganda, for whom the ICC pre-trial chamber unanimously confirmed all charges of sexual and gender-based crimes (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
06 April 2015 by Ella Sonja West, The Hague (The Netherlands)

At the International Criminal Court (ICC), prosecuting sexual and gender-based violence has been notoriously difficult. Documentary evidence has often proved insufficient and local officials, unwilling to cooperate. Despite such challenges, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), since Fatou Bensouda took over in 2012, has prioritized prosecution of such crimes.

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ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda during the October 2014 status conferences concerning the status of cooperation between her office and Kenya (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
25 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This article examines the value the International Criminal Court is increasingly placing on digital data and other technology as a way to reduce reliance on witness testimony. It completes a series by Tjitske Lingsma on the challenges faced by the ICC's Office of the Prosecution. The first article looked at its problems with witnesses [IJT-176] and the second, with intermediaries [IJT-177].

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Violence in the Central African Republic forced this family to leave home and live in the shell of an aircraft at Bangui International Airport, in December 2013 (Photo: Flickr/Catholic Relief Services/S.Phelps)
25 March 2015 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Every few weeks, it seems, a call sounds to establish a tribunal for mass-atrocity crimes. The most recent example is Syria, for which UN war crimes investigators this month urged the international community to set up a new court.  Failure to get Syria referred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) by the UN Security Council, with its deep-seated divisions, has clearly driven the search for alternatives.

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At a shelter for Yazidis refugees who fled IS attacks in Iraq, Mahoubet says the jihadist movement killed her husband and kidnapped her sister and daughter (Photo: Flickr/Caroline Gluck/EU/ECHO)
23 March 2015 by Karina Hof

The Islamic State (IS) is perpetuating heinous human rights violations in Iraq and members of the jihadist movement may be guilty of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, says a UN report released last week. Its author, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, recommends Iraq join the International Criminal Court and accept its jurisdiction “over the current situation”.

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Urban life in Ivory Coast (Photo: Flickr/Guillaume Mignot)
23 March 2015 by Christin Roby, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

The 20-year prison sentence handed to former Ivorian first lady Simone Gbagbo in Abidjan’s case against her and 82 others for undermining state security is being met with intense scrutiny. Though a victory to some, many Ivorians are unsatisfied.

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ICC judges in Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui case on a visit to Ituri in January 2012 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
11 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This is the second in a series of articles delving into the challenges faced by prosecutors at the International Criminal Court. In our last issue [IJT-176], Tjitske Lingsma explored why the ICC seems afflicted by untruthful witnesses. In the third article, we examine the growing importance of technological evidence, like phone records and computer data, to reduce the reliance on witness testimony.

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ICC's office of public counsel for victims at the Lubanga appeals hearing on 3 March 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
10 March 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In a landmark appeals ruling last week, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued guidelines on reparations to victims in the Lubanga case that are expected to lead the court in future cases.

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LRA child memorial (Photo: Flickr/Josh Zakary)
21 February 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

Uganda's decision to support the transfer of Dominic Ongwen [IJT-174] to the International Criminal Court (ICC), instead of trying the notorious Lord's Resistance Army commander at home, casts a shadow on the county's ability to hold domestic war crimes trials.

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The Comoros-flagged Mavi Marmara (Photo: Flickr/yasinonat)
10 February 2015 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Last week, the Comoros broke new legal ground at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Lawyers representing the African island nation challenged the prosecutor's decision to reject the demand to open an official investigation into the events surrounding Israel’s raid on a flotilla of activists attempting to run a naval blockade off the Gaza Strip in 2010.

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10 February 2010 by Hermione Gee

The last week has seen two important developments regarding ICC prosecutions of alleged war crimes committed in Darfur. Tajeldin Abdalla Adam is a journalist with Radio Dabanga, a Netherlands based station that broadcasts to Darfur. He told the IJT what these rulings will mean for Darfuris.

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