ICC

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22 June 2011 by Bram Posthumus in Amsterdam and Selay Marius Kouassi in Abidjan

In Ivory Coast, the gap between rhetoric and reality is growing dangerously large. On paper, all seems to be heading in the right direction. There is a Dialogue, Truth and Reconciliation Commission in place. Early June, the new government of president Alassane Ouattara declares it wants an end to impunity and justice for all. 

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22 June 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

Sri Lanka denies targeting civilians while crushing Tamil Tiger rebels but said action would be taken if war crimes allegations contained in a new British documentary were true. The Channel 4 documentary, “Sri Lanka’s Killing Fields”, contained footage of what it said were prisoner executions.

The programme also provided evidence to suggest that the Tamil Tiger fighters had also committed war crimes. Two UN investigators have confirmed the video as authentic, but the Sri Lankan authorities maintain it is fake. Victor Koppe, the lawyer for Tamil Tiger activists in Europe, told IJT how he would use such video evidence in court. 

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20 July 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The Appeals Court in The Hague on 7 July sentenced Joseph Mpambara to life imprisonment for war crimes committed during the genocide in Rwanda. 

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20 July 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

One might wonder why it has taken until 17 July 2011 to celebrate International Criminal Justice Day when international criminal courts have been established since 1993. Or whether there is any reason at all to celebrate International Criminal Justice Day, as the ICC has not yet convicted anyone. 

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14 September 2011 by Judie Kaberia

As the first three of the ‘Ocampo six’ soldiered on through the tough, painstaking and crucial journey of defending themselves against allegations of crimes against humanity last week, many Kenyans have high hopes that the International Criminal Court (ICC) process has opened a window of delivering justice for the 2008 post-election violence. 

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14 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Everyone has the right to information. This is especially true when it concerns human rights violations; victims’ relatives have the right to know what happened to their loved ones. 

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14 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court will try to convince judges that there is enough proof to start a trial against one of the driving forces behind a villainous Hutu militia, the FDLR. From Friday, they will present press releases, emails and intercepts of phone calls to show that Callixte Mbarushimana participated in a criminal plan to “create a humanitarian catastrophe” in eastern Congo. 

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14 September 2011 by Richard Walker

Five Sri Lankan men go on trial tomorrow in The Hague accused of supporting the separatist Tamil Tigers, or LTTE. But their possible convictions are the tip of the iceberg in a case which will be interpreted in Sri Lanka as a decision on who is right and wrong in the country’s 30 year civil war. 

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28 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Uhuru Kenyatta is sure his file at the International Criminal Court does not contain anything that implicates him in crimes against humanity. “We go to The Hague in the full expectation that justice will prevail and the truth emerges. We are innocent,” he said ahead of a series of hearings that may bring him to trial. 

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12 October 2011 by Bram Posthumus

Time is nearly up for the world’s first ever Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Human Rights Watch has published a report about his period in office, entitled “Unfinished Business”. International Justice Tribune talked with its author, Liz Evenson.

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