ICC

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Stephen Rapp speaking at a Coalition for the ICC event in 2013 (Photo: Flickr/CICC)
09 September 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Stephen Rapp told IJT that his office did everything they practically could do to ensure accountability in Syria by "documenting the heck" out of the atrocities that are being committed and collecting "irrefutable evidence". In one of his first interviews since stepping down last month as US Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, Rapp named the arrest of former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic as his finest moment in office.

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Bosco Ntaganda at the start of his trial (Flickr/ ICC-CPI)
02 September 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The trial of Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda which opened before the International Criminal Court Wednesday is a test of the prosecutor’s new strategy to look at sexual and gender-based violence in all of the cases [IJT-179].

In this case,  for the first time, the ICC has agreed that sexual violence against child soldiers by their own commanders could constitute a war crime. 

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27 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The International Criminal Court’s (ICC) first status conference was held in camera on 15 March. It was convened to provide an update on the prosecutor’s investigations in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). No information has filtered through on talks between the judges and Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo on this subject. But there have been strong echoes of a legal culture clash and the boundaries of responsibility between the pre-trial chamber and the prosecution.

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27 March 2006 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

The transfer of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, head of the Union of Congolese Patriots (UPC) to The Hague on March 17 stirred up questions about the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) investigations into the support given to the Congolese militia in Ituri (Democratic Republic of Congo). Thus far, the ICC has targeted only the leaders of the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group and not a single officer of the Ugandan army in its investigations into Uganda. However, the court may be setting its sights on several high-ranking Ugandan officers in the Ituri case.

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02 April 2007 by Ivan Slobod

The first case under Canada’s Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act (2000) opened at the main courthouse in Montreal on March 26, 2007. The defendant, who has been in custody since being arrested in Toronto nearly eighteen months ago, walked into the courtroom more nattily attired than any previous occupant of the prisoner’s box. Désiré Munyaneza, a Rwandan charged with genocide, wore a color-coordinated suit, shirt and tie. He looked around, spotting his wife, other family members, attorneys and the single judge.

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17 June 2007 by Thierry Ogier

Brazil played an active part in the creation of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Yet the Latin American giant has mostly stayed on the sidelines when it comes to international criminal justice. This is because, for several years now, its diplomatic activity has focused on gaining a permanent seat at the United Nations Security Council. At the same time, Brazilian courts have been slow to act when it comes to judging human rights violations committed under the prior military regime.

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16 June 2010 by David Rupiny

The biggest achievement at the two-week International Criminal Court review conference in Kampala, which ended last weekend, was the consensual agreement on the crime of aggression.

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25 August 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Hermione Gee

For more than a year Charles Taylor’s trial has taken place in relative obscurity. But since fashion model Naomi Campbell and actress Mia Farrow were asked to give evidence about a diamond Mr Taylor was alleged to have given to Campbell that has all changed. The IJT asked lead defense counsel for Mr Taylor, Courtenay Griffiths, about the challenges of conducting such a case under the spotlight.

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17 November 2010 by Katy Glassborow

The Sudanese government continues to keep a tight reign on free speech in the country thanks to the implementation of draconian national security laws. Rights activists denounce the laws not only as unconstitutional, but also violating international human rights standards.

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07 April 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Investigators of The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) have travelled to Kenya to probe the country’s post-election violence, a move welcomed by a number of local organisations. 

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