ICC

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16 June 2010 by David Rupiny

The biggest achievement at the two-week International Criminal Court review conference in Kampala, which ended last weekend, was the consensual agreement on the crime of aggression.

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25 August 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Hermione Gee

For more than a year Charles Taylor’s trial has taken place in relative obscurity. But since fashion model Naomi Campbell and actress Mia Farrow were asked to give evidence about a diamond Mr Taylor was alleged to have given to Campbell that has all changed. The IJT asked lead defense counsel for Mr Taylor, Courtenay Griffiths, about the challenges of conducting such a case under the spotlight.

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17 November 2010 by Katy Glassborow

The Sudanese government continues to keep a tight reign on free speech in the country thanks to the implementation of draconian national security laws. Rights activists denounce the laws not only as unconstitutional, but also violating international human rights standards.

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07 April 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Investigators of The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) have travelled to Kenya to probe the country’s post-election violence, a move welcomed by a number of local organisations. 

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21 April 2010 by Claire Wachira

Almost two years after the birth of Kenya’s Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC), set up in the aftermath of violent presidential elections, problems continue to plague the body. 

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05 May 2010 by Heikelina Verrijn

International judges and prosecutors claim to do their utmost to ensure that the practice of international criminal law satisfies fundamental principles. In practice, however, those principles often take second place to notions of human and humanitarian rights. 

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15 December 2010 by Koert Lindijer

Justice has always been a rare commodity in Sudan, and the imminent divorce between North and South Sudan will not necessarily lead to democracy and more human rights. Southern Sudan will be a fragile state and the North will probably become more autocratic. Meanwhile, the war in Darfur may even reignite. 

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02 March 2011 by Lisa Clifford

A murky deal involving millions of dollars in smuggled gold is the latest scandal engulfing the International Criminal Court indictee Bosco Ntaganda. 

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11 March 2011 by Bram Posthumus

There may be a future inquiry by the International Criminal Court into human rights crimes during Côte d’Ivoire’s post-electoral crisis. But that has no impact on the current situation in the country. 

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11 May 2011 by Bram Posthumus

A few months from now, Guineans will hold a sombre commemoration: on the 28th of September 2009, soldiers, militias and mercenaries went on the rampage in the capital’s main stadium. They shot at a crowd of people protesting Captain Moussa Dadis Camara’s possible candidacy in upcoming presidential elections. 157 people were killed and dozens of women raped. The victims and survivors of that mass crime are beginning to ask when justice will be their due. 

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