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16 September 2009 by Hermione Gee

“It’s important that we get back into a position of leadership”. Since 2005, Stephen Rapp has been prosecuting war criminals – first as Chief of Prosecutions for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, then as Chief Prosecutor for the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL), where he lead the case against former President of Liberia, Charles Taylor.

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05 December 2005 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Thousands of NGOs worldwide have been advocating for the International Criminal Court (ICC) for years. During the fourth Assembly of States Parties (ASP), which ended on December 3 in The Hague, dozens of them came to spur on the Court, in some cases not so gently.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

While in New York on 6 October, William Swing, head of the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), announced at a press conference that arrest warrants had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against five leaders of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a rebel group in Northern Uganda. A week before, the American diplomat had already told the Security Council about the arrest warrants in closed session. His notes were leaked to a Reuters reporter, who was first to spread the news. After months of preparing the first round of arrest warrants, ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo had to watch silently while others spoke out and vented opinions about still sealed documents. In terms of a communication strategy, it was a remarkable fiasco.

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10 October 2005 by Adele Waugaman

Most people hear the words "war crime" and think of the Nuremberg Trials or Slobodan Milosevic's trial, but that may soon change. Up till now, British soldiers have never been charged under this highly symbolic label. However, in July the British Attorney-General reversed this trend by announcing that three soldiers were being charged with "war crimes under the ICC Act [of] 2001". That announcement made Britain the first member of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to charge its own citizens under such law.

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11 April 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The Security Council's referral of the situation in Darfur to the International Criminal Court (ICC) has been hailed as a giant step in the history of international humanitarian law. It has also been criticised for applying double standards by exempting the United States from the ICC's jurisdiction.

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13 June 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army [LRA, the rebel movement in northern Uganda], and another LRA chief would be the object of the first arrest warrants issued by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court [ICC], the French daily Le Monde revealed on 10 June. For the last two months, the silence surrounding the maturation of the Uganda file has generated much speculation over the strategies being pursued.

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19 December 2005 by Franck Petit

Interview with Claude Jorda, judge at the International Criminal Court

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23 January 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

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27 June 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

After serving three years as chief prosecutor at the Special Court for Sierra Leone, David Crane will be leaving his post on 30 June. On 25 and 26 June, he chaired a work session in Freetown with the prosecutors of the International Criminal Court [ICC] and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda [ICTR] and the deputy prosecutor of the Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia [ICTY]. In an interview given to International Justice Tribune on the eve of the meeting, Crane reflected on the lessons learnt from the Sierra Leone experience. He said that the investigations into businessmen involved in the conflict are still ongoing and assured that it is only a matter of time before Nigeria arrests Charles Taylor and hands him over to the Special Court.

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21 November 2005 by Adele Waugaman

"We concluded that genocide has been committed in Darfur, and that the government of Sudan and the Janjaweed militia bear responsibility," then U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell told members of Congress in September 2004. With one word - genocide - Powell catapulted the United States to the forefront of international efforts to end abuses in war-torn western Sudan. "Today we are calling on the United Nations to initiate a full investigation [...] into all violations of international humanitarian law that have occurred in Darfur, with a view to ensuring accountability," he added. Six months later, those statements would compel the U.S. government to allow the UN Security Council to refer the Darfur situation to the International Criminal Court (ICC).

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