ICC

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06 September 2010 by Kenneth Manusama

On 25 August 2010, the UN Secretary-General published a report at the behest of the UN Security Council (UNSC), on the available options ‘to further the aim of prosecuting and imprisoning persons responsible for acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia.’ This report can be seen as a summary of a debate that was started in 2009 within the confines of the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia.

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06 September 2010 by Koert Lindijer

Many Kenyans were disgusted when Omar al Bashir turned up for a party in Kenya last month to celebrate the country’s new constitution. They were dismayed when authorities failed to arrest the Sudanese president even though the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his detention. His controversial visit raises the question of whether the Kenyan government, despite signing up to the ICC, is genuine about wanting to cooperate.

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02 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Commercially motivated pillage has taken on increasing importance in recent years as the illegal exploitation of natural resources has emerged as a primary means of financing conflict. But efforts to hold disreputable commercial actors responsible for war crimes or other serious human rights violations have been frustrated, frequently because of difficulties in proving corporate complicity. Larissa van den Herik of Leiden University organised the conference ‘Corporate War Crimes: Prosecuting Pillage of Natural Resources’ in The Hague last week.

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17 November 2010 by Marijntje Lazet

Last month, the International Criminal Court (ICC) held informal consultations in The Hague with 40 Palestinian NGOs. Michael Kearney, research fellow at the London School of Economics’ Law Department, was present as a representative of the NGO Al-Haq.

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17 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo was once a business tycoon, a warlord, a vice-president - and currently still has a seat in DR Congo’s senate. But from Monday he may take his seat in the dock as the most high profile war crimes suspect at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Prosecutors say he bears responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the Central African Republic (CAR), whose citizens are closely following the controversial process.

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Following Ivory Coast's post-election violence, Cristelle Semao Gueh and family at a camp in Duekoue (Caroline Gluck/Oxfam)
27 January 2015 by Christin Roby, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

The trial of Ivorian former first lady Simone Gbagbo and 82 co-defendants entered its fourth week of testimony in Abidjan on Monday. Gbagbo, along with former prime minister Aké N'Gbo and former president of the Ivorian Popular Front Affi N'Guessan, face charges of undermining state security through alleged involvement in atrocities that killed an estimated 3,000 after the November 2010 election.

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14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

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30 November 1999

ICC joins the Congolese chess game

​On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

Five Rwandan files kept on the back burner

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

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23 January 2006

DRC awaiting first arrest warrants

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

IER: truth without punishment

King Mohammed VI of Morocco has reason to be satisfied. Since completing its work a couple of weeks ago, the Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) has been flooded with compliments. The United States, France, Great Britain and many other countries have expressed their support for this unprecedented initiative in truth and democratization in the Arab-Islamic world. Never before has a country in this region embarked upon such a critical assessment of its past. But beyond the symbolic nature of the IER report, what exactly does it say?

The steel giant and the memory of Omarska

​In August 1992, Europe discovered the existence of concentration camps in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In the Prijedor region, Serb authorities were subjecting non-Serb civilians to inhuman detention conditions, torture and murder at Omarska, Keraterm and Trnopolje. Those images went around the world and remain one of the symbols of the Bosnian drama. After the conflict Omarska returned to what it used to be: an iron ore mine. But after buying the mine, international steel giant Mittal Steel must now deal with the strong memories.

Brief news:
• ICC: 6 victims to participate in DRC proceedings
• ICTR: The Uwilingiyimana mystery
• Spain accuses Cavallo
• The Netherlands: 15 years for Van Anraat
• Chile: Fujimori stays in prison
• Argentina: Lukic extradited to the ICTY
• Bosnia: a bloody and disorderly arrest

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19 February 2007

Liberians will have to wait for the truth

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in Liberia has indefinitely postponed the public hearings scheduled for January 31. The Commission, which was established under the 2003 Peace Agreement, is facing serious funding problems, while public expectation to see it begin holding hearings of victims and perpetrators is mounting.

Croatia reluctant to prosecute its politicians

Despite the evidence gathered during investigations, in addition to the evidence handed over by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Croatia's political class is in no hurry to try two of its most notorious politicians charged with war crimes: Branimir Glavas, a member of Parliament and retired general, and Tomislav Mercep, former MP and presidential candidate in 2000, even though this is Croatia's main obstacle to European Union (EU) membership.

International justice - new investment opportunity?

Recent gifts by Microsoft to the UN-backed Khmer Rouge Tribunal in Cambodia and a project reintegrating former paramilitaries in Colombia may signal a new era of private sector philanthropy. The burgeoning field of international justice is certainly in need of additional sources of funding, but would corporate contributions come at a hidden cost?

Morocco - From collective pardon to collective amnesia?

One year ago on January 6, 2006, the 17 members of Morocco's Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) were closing up shop after submitting their final report to King Mohammed VI. The Moroccan truth commission had received a flood of compliments from the international community praising the recommendations in its report, especially those advocating legislative and constitutional reforms. One year later, however, the results have been rather mixed.

 

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