ICC

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21 September 2010 by Kate Malleson

International judges are required to decide upon an increasingly wide range of issues of global importance, yet very few people know how these powerful decision-makers are selected. Our three-year judicial selection project was an attempt to shed some light on the subject (Mackenzie, Malleson, Martin and Sands, Selecting International Judges: Principle, Process and Politics, Oxford University Press, 2010). Based on interviews and case studies, our findings confirm that although the integrity and ability of the judges are not generally in issue, there are real dangers that political influence can have a distorting effect on the goal of selecting the most meritorious and independent candidates.

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06 September 2010 by Julia Romasevych and Paul Anstiss

Fact-finding at the international tribunals is not as precise as we think. Nancy Combs, Professor of Law at William and Mary Law School, explores this in her new book 'Fact-finding without facts: the uncertain evidentiary foundations of international criminal convictions'.

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30 June 2010 by Tajeldin Adam

Two Darfur rebel commanders appeared before the International Criminal Court’s pre-trial chamber in The Hague on June 17th, charged in connection with a deadly attack in 2007 on an African Union peacekeeping mission (AMIS) that killed 12 and wounded eight others in the village of Haskanita in Darfur.

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20 October 2010 by Judie Kaberia

News of a prominent Kenyan suspect surrendering himself to the International Criminal Court (ICC) last week sparked public excitement in the country. Meanwhile, Nairobi continues its struggle to reach justice for perpetrators of its post-election violence. 

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06 September 2010 by Kenneth Manusama

On 25 August 2010, the UN Secretary-General published a report at the behest of the UN Security Council (UNSC), on the available options ‘to further the aim of prosecuting and imprisoning persons responsible for acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia.’ This report can be seen as a summary of a debate that was started in 2009 within the confines of the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia.

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06 September 2010 by Koert Lindijer

Many Kenyans were disgusted when Omar al Bashir turned up for a party in Kenya last month to celebrate the country’s new constitution. They were dismayed when authorities failed to arrest the Sudanese president even though the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his detention. His controversial visit raises the question of whether the Kenyan government, despite signing up to the ICC, is genuine about wanting to cooperate.

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02 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Commercially motivated pillage has taken on increasing importance in recent years as the illegal exploitation of natural resources has emerged as a primary means of financing conflict. But efforts to hold disreputable commercial actors responsible for war crimes or other serious human rights violations have been frustrated, frequently because of difficulties in proving corporate complicity. Larissa van den Herik of Leiden University organised the conference ‘Corporate War Crimes: Prosecuting Pillage of Natural Resources’ in The Hague last week.

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17 November 2010 by Marijntje Lazet

Last month, the International Criminal Court (ICC) held informal consultations in The Hague with 40 Palestinian NGOs. Michael Kearney, research fellow at the London School of Economics’ Law Department, was present as a representative of the NGO Al-Haq.

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17 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo was once a business tycoon, a warlord, a vice-president - and currently still has a seat in DR Congo’s senate. But from Monday he may take his seat in the dock as the most high profile war crimes suspect at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Prosecutors say he bears responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the Central African Republic (CAR), whose citizens are closely following the controversial process.

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Following Ivory Coast's post-election violence, Cristelle Semao Gueh and family at a camp in Duekoue (Caroline Gluck/Oxfam)
27 January 2015 by Christin Roby, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

The trial of Ivorian former first lady Simone Gbagbo and 82 co-defendants entered its fourth week of testimony in Abidjan on Monday. Gbagbo, along with former prime minister Aké N'Gbo and former president of the Ivorian Popular Front Affi N'Guessan, face charges of undermining state security through alleged involvement in atrocities that killed an estimated 3,000 after the November 2010 election.

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