ICC

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.

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06 October 2010 by Paul Anstiss

With the upcoming elections in Myanmar, the world is refocusing its attention on the military regime that is ruling the country. The US has recently voiced its support for a UN inquiry into alleged war crimes.

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20 October 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Truth commissions have gained steady ground as a mechanism to deal with past atrocities. In 2009 alone, five commissions were set up. Geneva-based expert Priscilla Hayner studied over 40 truth commissions established since the 1970s to record the 'unspeakable truths' about human rights abuses.

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03 November 2010 by Juergen Schurr

A French court on October 27th refused to release Callixte Mbarushimana, raising expectations that he will soon be transferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC). The ICC wants him for war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

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20 October 2010 by Koert Lindijer

France's arrest last week of Callixte Mbarushimana, a key player in the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), has again put the spotlight on the group which has terrorised parts of Rwanda and the DR Congo for the past two decades.

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20 October 2010 by Bette Dam

Almost a decade after US and UK troops invaded Afghanistan, human rights advocates blame both local and international players for the state of impunity still prevailing in the country.

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21 September 2010 by Kate Malleson

International judges are required to decide upon an increasingly wide range of issues of global importance, yet very few people know how these powerful decision-makers are selected. Our three-year judicial selection project was an attempt to shed some light on the subject (Mackenzie, Malleson, Martin and Sands, Selecting International Judges: Principle, Process and Politics, Oxford University Press, 2010). Based on interviews and case studies, our findings confirm that although the integrity and ability of the judges are not generally in issue, there are real dangers that political influence can have a distorting effect on the goal of selecting the most meritorious and independent candidates.

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06 September 2010 by Julia Romasevych and Paul Anstiss

Fact-finding at the international tribunals is not as precise as we think. Nancy Combs, Professor of Law at William and Mary Law School, explores this in her new book 'Fact-finding without facts: the uncertain evidentiary foundations of international criminal convictions'.

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30 June 2010 by Tajeldin Adam

Two Darfur rebel commanders appeared before the International Criminal Court’s pre-trial chamber in The Hague on June 17th, charged in connection with a deadly attack in 2007 on an African Union peacekeeping mission (AMIS) that killed 12 and wounded eight others in the village of Haskanita in Darfur.

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20 October 2010 by Judie Kaberia

News of a prominent Kenyan suspect surrendering himself to the International Criminal Court (ICC) last week sparked public excitement in the country. Meanwhile, Nairobi continues its struggle to reach justice for perpetrators of its post-election violence. 

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