ICC

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02 June 2010 by Hermione Gee

Monday’s deadly raid by Israeli forces on a Turkish boat carrying aid to the Gaza Strip has been widely condemned by world leaders as a violation of international law.

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22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

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18 February 2008 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

"It is the first time that a free ex-militia leader in Ituri has been handed over to the International Criminal Court (ICC)", said the Office of the Prosecutor after Mathieu Ngudjolo was arrested on February 6 in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Ngudjolo, the former head of the Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI), led a Lendu militia opposed to Thomas Lubanga's primarily Hema Union of Congolese Patriots. Lubanga and Germain Katanga, commander of the Congolese Patriotic Resistance Forces (FRPI) which was allied with the FNI, were already in custody in the DRC before being transferred to The Hague.

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16 June 2010 by Robin van Wechem

Mirjam Blaak, Uganda’s deputy head of mission to Brussels and lead person to the International Criminal Court (ICC), hosted the Review Conference of the Rome Statute in Kampala that ended last Friday.

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02 June 2010 by Hermione Gee

The first International Criminal Court (ICC) Review Conference in Kampala, Uganda “is a chance to build the court into all that it can be and all that it must be,” United Nations Secretary General Ban-Ki Moon told delegates on Monday.

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18 February 2008 by Erika Kinetz

Victims of the Khmer Rouge had their first, historic day in court this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). On February 8, Theary Seng, who is quickly becoming the poster child for the genocide that ravaged Cambodia in the late 1970s, stood to address a man she believes was responsible for the deaths of her parents and 1.7 million other Cambodians: Nuon Chea, Pol Pot's right-hand man and most trusted deputy, who is charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. "For us, the graveyard was our playground," she said.

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19 May 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Eric Beauchemin

The Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Court (ICC), Luis Moreno Ocampo, is back in The Hague after a five day trip to the Kenyan capital, Nairobi. He was there to meet with victims of the violence that swept the country following disputed presidential elections in 2007.

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21 January 2008 by Thierry Cruvellier

Prepared, conscientious prosecutors, tenacious lawyers concentrated on the evidence, a chamber presided over with firmness and competence, pertinent witnesses: the trail of former Liberian president Charles Taylor, opened January 7 by a Special Court for Sierra Leone moved to the premises of the ICC at The Hague, has begun with dignity.

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.

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06 October 2010 by Paul Anstiss

With the upcoming elections in Myanmar, the world is refocusing its attention on the military regime that is ruling the country. The US has recently voiced its support for a UN inquiry into alleged war crimes.

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