ICC

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02 June 2010 by Hermione Gee

The first International Criminal Court (ICC) Review Conference in Kampala, Uganda “is a chance to build the court into all that it can be and all that it must be,” United Nations Secretary General Ban-Ki Moon told delegates on Monday.

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18 February 2008 by Erika Kinetz

Victims of the Khmer Rouge had their first, historic day in court this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). On February 8, Theary Seng, who is quickly becoming the poster child for the genocide that ravaged Cambodia in the late 1970s, stood to address a man she believes was responsible for the deaths of her parents and 1.7 million other Cambodians: Nuon Chea, Pol Pot's right-hand man and most trusted deputy, who is charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. "For us, the graveyard was our playground," she said.

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19 May 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Eric Beauchemin

The Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Court (ICC), Luis Moreno Ocampo, is back in The Hague after a five day trip to the Kenyan capital, Nairobi. He was there to meet with victims of the violence that swept the country following disputed presidential elections in 2007.

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21 January 2008 by Thierry Cruvellier

Prepared, conscientious prosecutors, tenacious lawyers concentrated on the evidence, a chamber presided over with firmness and competence, pertinent witnesses: the trail of former Liberian president Charles Taylor, opened January 7 by a Special Court for Sierra Leone moved to the premises of the ICC at The Hague, has begun with dignity.

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.

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06 October 2010 by Paul Anstiss

With the upcoming elections in Myanmar, the world is refocusing its attention on the military regime that is ruling the country. The US has recently voiced its support for a UN inquiry into alleged war crimes.

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20 October 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Truth commissions have gained steady ground as a mechanism to deal with past atrocities. In 2009 alone, five commissions were set up. Geneva-based expert Priscilla Hayner studied over 40 truth commissions established since the 1970s to record the 'unspeakable truths' about human rights abuses.

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03 November 2010 by Juergen Schurr

A French court on October 27th refused to release Callixte Mbarushimana, raising expectations that he will soon be transferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC). The ICC wants him for war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

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20 October 2010 by Koert Lindijer

France's arrest last week of Callixte Mbarushimana, a key player in the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), has again put the spotlight on the group which has terrorised parts of Rwanda and the DR Congo for the past two decades.

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20 October 2010 by Bette Dam

Almost a decade after US and UK troops invaded Afghanistan, human rights advocates blame both local and international players for the state of impunity still prevailing in the country.

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