ICC

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11 September 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

Four years ago, on September 19, 2002, an aborted coup d'état attempt plunged Côte d'Ivoire into civil war and political violence. In October 2003, Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo sent a document to The Hague acknowledging the International Criminal Court's (ICC) jurisdiction over the crimes committed in Côte d'Ivoire since September 2002. The Court finally confirmed the existence of this document in February 2005. However, one and a half years later, and despite several detailed investigations by the UN and NGOs, the ICC prosecutor is "still questioning whether crimes were committed, analyzing the issues of jurisdiction and admissibility, and trying to determine whether the interests of justice would be served by opening an investigation," according to the ICC's report to the UN Assembly General in August. 

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23 October 2006 by Christine Chaumeau

China is keeping a polite distance from international criminal justice. Beijing is hardly disinterested, but China does want to make sure that these new global mechanisms are not going to infringe upon its sovereignty by delving into particularly sensitive cases such as Tibet. 

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04 December 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Franck Petit

Three years after it began operating, the International Criminal Court (ICC) now employs 650 people, has ongoing investigations in three African countries, its first suspect in custody and is playing a key role in the Uganda peace negotiations. "Is the ICC still having teething problems?" wondered Professor Antonio Cassesse a few months ago in the Journal of International Criminal Justice. The States Parties to the ICC seem to be saying no, as overall, they are satisfied with the court's initial results. On December 1 in The Hague, they allocated almost 89 million euros to the court for its 2007 budget - a 10% increase over last year.

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24 July 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Nearly four years after it was established, with its board of directors up for re-election at the end of 2006, the Victims Trust Fund, and autonomous body of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is still not up and running. In December 2005, the ICC's Assembly of States Parties (ASP) finally adopted the Fund's bylaws and decided to equip it with a secretariat, making it possible for the Fund to begin operating - at least in theory.

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20 November 2006 by Adele Waugaman

The United Kingdom, one of the earliest and strongest advocates of the International Criminal Court (ICC), has been challenged continuously by the task of balancing its principled support for international justice with practical policy decisions. At home, London has rethought how to legally address criminal acts committed by its soldiers in Iraq; on the UN Security Council, it has sought to broker compromise between its ICC support and the formal opposition of its closest ally, the United States; and in The Hague, it has established a close yet critical relationship with an institution it played a key role in creating. In its response to the challenges presented in each of these settings, London has demonstrated confident realism in its principled yet pragmatic support for the ICC.

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19 February 2007 by Laetitia Grotti

One year ago on January 6, 2006, the 17 members of Morocco's Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) were closing up shop after submitting their final report to King Mohammed VI. The Moroccan truth commission had received a flood of compliments from the international community praising the recommendations in its report, especially those advocating legislative and constitutional reforms. One year later, however, the results have been rather mixed.

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05 March 2007 by Franck Petit

Law professor at the University of Florence in Italy and the first president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Antonio Cassese presided over the United Nation's Commission of Inquiry on Darfur. The Commission's January 25, 2005 report led to the referral of the case to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In this interview, Cassese reacts to ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo's February 27 announcement of the initial results from his Darfur investigation.

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16 April 2007 by Ed Lane

India was an active participant at the Rome conference that created the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 1998. Much of its interest was linked to the legacy of the country's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, who had a vision of nations not allied with major power blocs. An international court that is not beholden to such blocs has some appeal in India. But issues of sovereignty, internal insurgencies and India's aspiration to have a permanent seat at the UN Security Council made it not signing the ICC Statute.

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22 January 2007 by Emilia Richard

The Kilwa massacre trial, which opened December 12 before the Lubumbashi military high court, resumed on January 18. The Kilwa massacres were committed in Katanga by the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) in October 2004. Congolese military authorities are charging Colonel Ademar Ilunga with war crimes, along with eight FARDC members, and for the first time, three foreign nationals employed by the Canadian mining company Anvil Mining - Pierre Mercier, Peter Van Niekerk and Cedric Kirsten - are charged with complicity.

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18 June 2007 by Catherine Dupeyron

After the genocide of the Jews during the Second World Ward and since the 1950s, Israel has been actively engaged in the project for an international criminal court. In Rome, in 1998, its leaders hoped to be able to adhere to the Rome Statute creating the International Criminal Court (ICC). But the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians - and the continued existence of settlements in the Occupied Territories, which puts Israel at risk of being accused by the court - decided otherwise.

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