ICC

article
05 March 2007 by Franck Petit

Law professor at the University of Florence in Italy and the first president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Antonio Cassese presided over the United Nation's Commission of Inquiry on Darfur. The Commission's January 25, 2005 report led to the referral of the case to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In this interview, Cassese reacts to ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo's February 27 announcement of the initial results from his Darfur investigation.

article
16 April 2007 by Ed Lane

India was an active participant at the Rome conference that created the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 1998. Much of its interest was linked to the legacy of the country's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, who had a vision of nations not allied with major power blocs. An international court that is not beholden to such blocs has some appeal in India. But issues of sovereignty, internal insurgencies and India's aspiration to have a permanent seat at the UN Security Council made it not signing the ICC Statute.

article
22 January 2007 by Emilia Richard

The Kilwa massacre trial, which opened December 12 before the Lubumbashi military high court, resumed on January 18. The Kilwa massacres were committed in Katanga by the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) in October 2004. Congolese military authorities are charging Colonel Ademar Ilunga with war crimes, along with eight FARDC members, and for the first time, three foreign nationals employed by the Canadian mining company Anvil Mining - Pierre Mercier, Peter Van Niekerk and Cedric Kirsten - are charged with complicity.

article
18 June 2007 by Catherine Dupeyron

After the genocide of the Jews during the Second World Ward and since the 1950s, Israel has been actively engaged in the project for an international criminal court. In Rome, in 1998, its leaders hoped to be able to adhere to the Rome Statute creating the International Criminal Court (ICC). But the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians - and the continued existence of settlements in the Occupied Territories, which puts Israel at risk of being accused by the court - decided otherwise.

article
07 May 2007 by Tumi Makgetla

South Africa has unmatched economic and moral power on the African continent, where the International Criminal Court (ICC) has focused its first prosecutions. The government's attitudes towards the ICC are shaped by its anti-colonial struggle against apartheid and by its own choice of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

article
21 May 2007 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

Since its conception, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has found its most fervent supporters in Europe. No fewer than 20 European countries participated in the pro-ICC "like-minded group" of 58 during the Rome Statute negotiations in 1998. This diplomatic activism—rewarded by the election of judges from Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Ireland, Latvia and other European states to the permanent court—has continued unfailingly within the European Union (EU). However, on a practical level, the cooperation is less effective and relations with the ICC remain bilateral for the most part, just like relationships between States regarding universal jurisdiction cases.

article
02 June 2010 by Hermione Gee

Monday’s deadly raid by Israeli forces on a Turkish boat carrying aid to the Gaza Strip has been widely condemned by world leaders as a violation of international law.

article
22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

article
18 February 2008 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

"It is the first time that a free ex-militia leader in Ituri has been handed over to the International Criminal Court (ICC)", said the Office of the Prosecutor after Mathieu Ngudjolo was arrested on February 6 in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Ngudjolo, the former head of the Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI), led a Lendu militia opposed to Thomas Lubanga's primarily Hema Union of Congolese Patriots. Lubanga and Germain Katanga, commander of the Congolese Patriotic Resistance Forces (FRPI) which was allied with the FNI, were already in custody in the DRC before being transferred to The Hague.

article
16 June 2010 by Robin van Wechem

Mirjam Blaak, Uganda’s deputy head of mission to Brussels and lead person to the International Criminal Court (ICC), hosted the Review Conference of the Rome Statute in Kampala that ended last Friday.

Pages