ICC

article
16 September 2009 by Hermione Gee

“It’s important that we get back into a position of leadership”. Since 2005, Stephen Rapp has been prosecuting war criminals – first as Chief of Prosecutions for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, then as Chief Prosecutor for the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL), where he lead the case against former President of Liberia, Charles Taylor.

article
01 December 2010 by Pablo Gamez

This November marked the 65th anniversary of the Nuremberg war crimes tribunals. International Criminal Court Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo looks back at the historical trials and discusses their impact on current international justice.

article
15 December 2010 by Leiuh Asuman Wakida and Priscilla Nadunga

Almost seven years after Uganda gave the names of the top Lord’s Resistance Army commanders to the International Criminal Court, the country remains divided as to which path should be taken towards justice. Some Ugandan public figures are again calling for the formation of a truth and reconciliation body.

article
01 December 2010 by Claire Wachira

Kenya expects the International Criminal Court this month to hand out six arrest warrants to alleged perpetrators of the country’s post-election violence. Public speculation is rife, and the looming warrants are causing tension between Kenya’s two main political parties.

article
15 December 2010 by Caasi Sagalai

“Life here is terrible. Our children are dying from the extreme cold. We are refugees in our own country,” says a resident of the Ya Mumbi Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camp in Kenya’s Northern Rift valley region. Three years after violence swept the country following the December 2007 elections, Kenya clearly still struggles in its aftermath.

article
12 June 2006 by Juanita Leon

On May 18, ten days before President Alvaro Uribe was reelected, the Colombian Constitutional Court upheld the controversial "Justice and Peace" Law, which provides a legal framework for trying the crimes committed by Colombian paramilitaries and guerrillas. However, for the sake of protecting victims' rights, the high court struck down some provisions of the law that were of particular interest to the leaders of the so-called "self-defense groups", which have been demobilizing since 2003 with some 38,000 combatants.

article
10 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

This week the UN Security Council may ask the Netherlands to host the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established four years ago in Freetown, so that it can try its most important defendant, former Liberian president Charles Taylor, who has been incarcerated since March 29. Officially, security is the reason cited for this relocation, which would bring an end to the " Sierra Leonean model. " More than likely though, it is the result of a political agreement.

article
24 April 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

When Dutch ad hoc defence counsel Tjarda van der Spoel, who was assigned to the DRC case on August 1, 2005, arrived at the ICC building in The Hague, he was not too sure what his role would be. He had to hand in his passport to get an ICC badge and was accompanied throughout the building by a security guard. He did not have a room where he could hang his coat and put on his robe. For reasons of confidentiality he was not allowed to electronically file submissions from outside the building. But, Van der Spoel told IJT, "everybody I met in the huge white building on Maanweg was friendly enough and willing to cooperate."

article
12 June 2006 by Juanita Leon

Interview with Antanas Mockus

Iconoclastic politician Antanas Mockus received only 1.2% of the votes in Columbia's presidential election on May 28, but he is well-known for his intellectual capacities. Former dean of the National University and two-term mayor of Bogota, Mockus has mobilized public opinion against the violent actions of the Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC) guerrilla. One of his campaign themes was that "pardons were not guaranteed," because the International Criminal Court (ICC) could always step in to try these crimes. He discussed the role of the ICC in Colombia with IJT and explained why he supported it the clause for a 7-year delay before the Rome Treaty enters into force.

article
13 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first international tribunal to allow victims to actively participate. The trial chamber's January 17 ruling allows six victims to get involved at a very early stage of the proceedings - during the investigations that the ICC is conducting in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). On January 23, the prosecutor filed an application for leave to appeal this decision he strongly opposes. From his point of view, "the broad scope of victim participation envisioned creates a serious imbalance between victims and any future accused persons", and admitting them at the investigation stage could lead the chamber to "premature and inappropriate factual conclusions".

Pages