ICC

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25 November 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The International Criminal Court (ICC) opened its second trial in The Hague this week. On the stand are the Congolese former militiamen Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui who are accused of orchestrating the massacre of about 200 civilians in the village of Bogoro, in the Ituri province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). 

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23 December 2009 by Hermione Gee

Isaac Fransman: born in Amsterdam July 23 1898, deceased 9 April 1943 in Sobibor; Rachel Fransman-Lochem: born in Amsterdam July 7 1900, April 9 1943 deceased in Sobibor.

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09 December 2009 by Frank Petit

In 2005 Colombia introduced the Justice and Peace Law (JPL) in an effort to combat the problem of paramilitary groups rampant in the country. The law offers fighters lenient penalties for human rights abuses in return for voluntary demobilisation. Michael Reed-Hurtado is Head of Office at the International Center for Transitional Justice in Colombia. He spoke to the IJT’s Frank Petit about how the law is working.

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23 December 2009 by Hélène Michaud

It might seem like just another village meeting, but the presence of armed police at the local parish hall suggests something serious is going on.

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09 December 2009 by Michael Kaloki

On a visit to Nairobi this week, former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan welcomed the Kenyan government’s assurance that it will cooperate fully with the International Criminal Court (ICC) on establishing the best way to secure justice for victims of the 2007 post-election violence.

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25 November 2009 by Sylvere Unen

As the trial of former militiamen Mathieu Ngudjolo and Germain Katanga opened this week at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, residents of their home district of Ituri in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are losing faith in the court. 

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28 October 2009 by Hermione Gee and Karl Dowling

During Uruguay’s national election Sunday, voters were also asked to decide whether to overturn an existing amnesty law that protects military and police personnel accused of crimes committed during the 1973-1985 military junta.

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02 March 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The International Criminal Court has much work to do, especially since the landmark decision by the UN Security Council Saturday, to refer the case of Libya to the court. But how long will it take to prosecute suspects? A conversation with William Pace, Convenor of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court (CICC), a global coalition of 2,500 NGOs.

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25 May 2011 by Bram Posthumus

President Alassane Ouattara of Ivory Coast says he wants national dialogue and reconciliation and an end to impunity. Noble intentions - but his country may have more pressing issues to deal with, plus the fact that not everyone is prepared to reconcile.

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11 May 2011 by Geert-Jan Knoops

In 2002, when the United States openly suggested resorting to a pre-emptive military strike against Iraq in its fight against terrorism, then French President Jacques Chirac, in the New York Times, fiercely opposed this approach as being contrary to international law - opening a door to abuse and setting a wrong precedent. “Suppose that China would invade Taiwan because Taiwan would be an alleged security threat to China. What would the world say?", the French president exclaimed.

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