ICC

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07 April 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Catherine Mabille and Marc Desalliers represent former Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, who stands trial at The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) for conscripting and using child soldiers. The lawyers have complained about ongoing problems during the trial.

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26 September 2011 by Mariângela Guimarães

When I first watched ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian black comedy, at the cinema in Brazil, years after it was originally released, I was still a teenager. I remember finding it funny that black dots popped up on the screen to cover up sexual acts and parts of the body that we weren’t supposed to see. This was at the end of the 1970s and Brazil was under a military dictatorship that did things much worse than censoring film scenes. Every time I mention something from those years, like that experience at the movies, I notice that many people, and even younger Brazilians, seem to forget that the country was once ruled by a repressive regime.

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20 October 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The death of former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has sparked speculation about what this means for international justice. Obviously, the arrest warrant issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for crimes against humanity in June, will die with him.

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14 October 2009 by Lynn Maalouf

Six months after the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) opened its doors, a drastically changed political and security environment in Lebanon, coupled with trim concrete output from The Hague, are driving even some of the tribunal’s staunchest advocates to adopt an increasingly cautious stance towards the court. This is visible in both dampened expectations and increasing questions as to whether the very mechanism will prove to be the best model for trying a crime of terrorism.

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25 November 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The International Criminal Court (ICC) opened its second trial in The Hague this week. On the stand are the Congolese former militiamen Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui who are accused of orchestrating the massacre of about 200 civilians in the village of Bogoro, in the Ituri province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). 

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23 December 2009 by Hermione Gee

Isaac Fransman: born in Amsterdam July 23 1898, deceased 9 April 1943 in Sobibor; Rachel Fransman-Lochem: born in Amsterdam July 7 1900, April 9 1943 deceased in Sobibor.

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09 December 2009 by Frank Petit

In 2005 Colombia introduced the Justice and Peace Law (JPL) in an effort to combat the problem of paramilitary groups rampant in the country. The law offers fighters lenient penalties for human rights abuses in return for voluntary demobilisation. Michael Reed-Hurtado is Head of Office at the International Center for Transitional Justice in Colombia. He spoke to the IJT’s Frank Petit about how the law is working.

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23 December 2009 by Hélène Michaud

It might seem like just another village meeting, but the presence of armed police at the local parish hall suggests something serious is going on.

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09 December 2009 by Michael Kaloki

On a visit to Nairobi this week, former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan welcomed the Kenyan government’s assurance that it will cooperate fully with the International Criminal Court (ICC) on establishing the best way to secure justice for victims of the 2007 post-election violence.

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25 November 2009 by Sylvere Unen

As the trial of former militiamen Mathieu Ngudjolo and Germain Katanga opened this week at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, residents of their home district of Ituri in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are losing faith in the court. 

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