Hissène Habré

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
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11 May 2011 by Bram Posthumus

A few months from now, Guineans will hold a sombre commemoration: on the 28th of September 2009, soldiers, militias and mercenaries went on the rampage in the capital’s main stadium. They shot at a crowd of people protesting Captain Moussa Dadis Camara’s possible candidacy in upcoming presidential elections. 157 people were killed and dozens of women raped. The victims and survivors of that mass crime are beginning to ask when justice will be their due. 

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Chadians in court to hear verdict of DDS henchmen trial
25 March 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The court room was packed this morning at the Palais du 15 janvier to hear the verdict in the case of the former agents of Chadian dictator Hissène Habré's feared political police: the Directorate of Documentation and Security (DDS). Anti-riot police were posted all around the room to separate the hundreds of victims and the families of the accused present.

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Chadians demonstrate for justice in January, following a second suspension of the trial against Habré’s henchmen (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
24 March 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After a 26-year wait and a four-month trial that saw victims finally confront alleged criminal accomplices of former dictator Hissène Habré [IJT-170], a Chad court is expected to deliver its ruling on 25 March. Judges will decide the fate of the 21 accused, facing charges of torture, murder, illegal arrest and arbitrary detention.

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Mbacké Fall, prosecutor of the Extraordinary African Chambers (Photo: ForumChambresAfricaines.org)
22 February 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

Hissène Habré is due to face trial in Senegal within three months of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) 13 February ruling that there is enough evidence against the former Chadian dictator to proceed. 

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Palais du 15 Janvier in N'Djaména, where the trial of 21 alleged Habré accomplices opened in November (Flickr/kendoerr)
10 February 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The prosecutor of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) last week filed his final indictment against Hissène Habré, bringing the trial of the former Chadian president [IJT-165] one step closer to reality.

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10 February 2010 by Bram Posthumus

An international legal drama is playing itself out in the Senegalese capital Dakar, against the backdrop of the Monument for the African Renaissance. Main characters in no specific order: Hissène Habré, former president of the central African state of Chad, Abdoulaye Wade, president of Senegal, the African Union, Belgium, lawyers and human rights groups. At issue: can an African state put a former head of another African state on trial for crimes against humanity?

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14 December 2010 by Reed Brody

Will the Chadian victims of Hissène Habré’s regime finally achieve justice? After a successful donors’ meeting to finance his trial in Dakar, and a curious legal decision by the ECOWAS calling for a special court to try the former dictator, the answer depends more than ever on the political will of Senegal, where Habré has lived since his fall 20 years ago.

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