article
07 December 2011 by -

The primary purpose of the retrial of Ramush Haradinaj, as proclaimed by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in its appeal judgement in July, should have been to hear testimonies of two “key” witnesses who proved unwilling to testify in the original trial in 2007.

By Radosa Milutinovic, The Hague

article
17 March 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 85

Table of content:

article
04 February 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 82

Table of content:

  • Truth Commission in Liberia: Liberian commission getting close to big guns
  • Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia: Haradinaj: the end of a trial of exceptions

Click here to download the IJT, No. 82

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article
article
14 March 2005 by Laurent Abadie

The Prime Minister of Kosovo, Ramush Haradinaj, who is accused of crimes against humanity and of violating the laws and customs of war, is the first serving politician to be indicted by the ICTY since the ex-Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic. A former commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), Haradinaj was elected by parliament on 3 December to serve in the UN-administered province. On 8 March, he resigned, preferring to face the UN court "as a common citizen".

article
05 May 2008 by -

The request is radical: it asks the Appeals Chamber to order a re-trial.

The prosecution blames the judges for not having given it the means to obtain testimony from witnesses who did not come forward due to intimidation and fear. Indeed, the Trial Chamber wrote in its decision that it had "the strong impression that the trial was being held in an atmosphere where witnesses felt unsafe".

article
27 March 2006 by -

Ramush Haradinaj, the former prime minister of Kosovo who now stands accused of war crimes, has been authorized by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) since March 10 "to appear in public and engage in political activities under the supervision of UNMIK" - the local UN mission. The decision was initially issued on October 12, 2005 [IJT-21 & 34]but was deferred when the prosecutor appealed.

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19 March 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

When he first appeared before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on March 9, 2005, Ramush Haradinaj was Prime Minister of Kosovo. A former nightclub bouncer, he became leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) during the conflict with Serbia in 1998. His subordinate Idriz Balaj was commander of the KLA "Black Eagles", a "rapid intervention special unit". And his uncle, Lahi Brahimaj, was in charge of the KLA's finances. But for the prosecution, the trial of these three men, which started in The Hague on March 5, 2007, is not about a resistance movement breaching the laws of war, but about the cruel abuse of power.

issue
19 March 2007

The impossible math of gacaca justice

Two years after the official March 10, 2005 start date for genocide trials before gacaca (community) courts, nearly 60,000 decisions have been rendered. This impressive figure, however, represents only 7% of those being prosecuted in Rwanda. And yet, the government has announced gacaca trials will finish at the end of 2007.

A new Ovcara trial opens without the victims

The families of 200 people massacred at Ovcara, near Vukovar, in November 1991, were conspicuous by their absence when the trial started over again on March 12 before the Special Court for War Crimes in Belgrade. The families are demanding that the Croatian government pay their travel expenses, after having refused assistance from the Belgrade Humanitarian Law Center. At the end of the first trial in 2005, 16 defendants were sentenced to a total of 231 years in prison for what was the worst war crime committed on Croatian territory during the war in former Yugoslavia. However, on December 14, 2006, the Supreme Court of Belgrade reversed that judgment and ordered a new trial, provoking indignation from the victims.

Haradinaj, trial in troubled waters

When he first appeared before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on March 9, 2005, Ramush Haradinaj was Prime Minister of Kosovo. A former nightclub bouncer, he became leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) during the conflict with Serbia in 1998. His subordinate Idriz Balaj was commander of the KLA "Black Eagles", a "rapid intervention special unit". And his uncle, Lahi Brahimaj, was in charge of the KLA's finances. But for the prosecution, the trial of these three men, which started in The Hague on March 5, 2007, is not about a resistance movement breaching the laws of war, but about the cruel abuse of power.

Brief news:

• Burundi: New impasse between United Nations and government

• Cambodia: Progress on the rules of procedure for the Extraordinary Chambers

• Afghanistan: A sanitized amnesty

issue
08 December 2011

Links to articles and PDF of IJT 141.

Haradinaj