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20 September 2004 by -

Recent manoeuvres by lawyers defending General Pinochet to spare the former dictator from appearing before Judge Guzman, have finally come to nothing. Recent manoeuvres by lawyers defending General Pinochet to spare the former dictator from appearing before Judge Guzman, have finally come to nothing. Pinochet, who was stripped of his immunity by the Chilean Supreme Court on 26 August, was about to be questioned by Judge Guzman at the beginning of September. But a motion filed by his lawyers gave him a last minute reprieve.

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20 September 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

The tide seems to have turned for former South American dictators. Argentina's Supreme Court has just accepted the imprescriptibility of a crime against humanity, while in Chile a trial looks likely for Augusto Pinochet after the former dictator was stripped of his immunity on 26 August.

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20 December 2004 by -

Three months after the Supreme Court of Chile removed his immunity, Augusto Pinochet was formally charged by Judge Guzman and placed under house arrest on 13 December. The former dictator could now stand trial in the Chilean courts for the abduction and murder of political opponents in the framework of Operation Condor. Judge Guzman\'s decision, which he admits was «fairly easy to take», came as a surprise to many Chileans.

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06 December 2004 by -

On 2 December, the Chilean Appeals Court voted to strip the former dictator Augusto Pinochet of his diplomatic immunity in the case of the murder of Carlos Prats, former commander of the Chilean army. Prats, who opposed the coup d'etat orchestrated by Pinochet against President Salvador Allende in September 1973, was killed by a car bomb on 30 September 1974 in Buenos Aires. The General has already had his immunity lifted in the Condor file.

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10 October 2005 by Lucien O. Chauvin

Abimael Guzmán, the famous leader of Peru's Maoist Shining Path group, began facing judges September 26 in his third trial. Guzmán and 23 of his followers who were allegedly members of the outlawed party's Central Committee are being tried by a special anti-terrorism court presided by Judge Pablo Talavera and two other magistrates. There are, however, only 12 defendants in the courtroom. The others are being tried in absentia.

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07 November 2005 by Lucien Chauvin

The retrial of Peru's Maoist Shining Path rebel group entered its second full month with the defense and prosecution spending more time questioning the court than each other. Guzmán's attorney, Manuel Fajardo, spent the first month of the trial objecting to the court, its location on a military base and the generic charge of terrorism. He also continued his fight against the retrial itself, putting forth motions for dismissal based on "double jeopardy," since Guzmán already stood trial on terrorism after his arrest in September 1992 *see IJT-33+. The prosecutor did not stand idly by either.

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13 June 2005 by MYRIAM HERNANDEZ

On 7 June, former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet had a day of victory and defeat. The victory was the Santiago appeal court's decision to end proceedings against him and his former interior minister, retired General Cesar Benavides, on charges relating to the repression of political opponents as part of Operation Condor. The defeat came from the plenary hearing at the same court, which lifted his political immunity in the case of the millions of dollars deposited in Riggs Bank in Washington, DC.

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10 October 2005 by ARNAUD GRELLIER

Juan Guzman Tapia retired from the magistracy in May 2005. During his career, he prepared hundreds of cases against ex-dictator Augusto Pinochet filed by families of disappeared persons in Chile. On a visit to Paris to promote his autobiography "Aboard the World," he spoke to IJT.

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23 October 2006 by Lucien O. Chauvin

The recent conviction of the principal leaders of Peru's Maoist Shining Path guerrillas will likely not bring an end to the legal battle that has lasted 14 years. Nevertheless, on October 13, Shining Path founder and leader Abimael Guzman, 71, was convicted on seven counts and sentenced to life in prison. The party's second in command and Guzman's lover, Elena Iparraguirre, 59, also received a life sentence and 10 other co-defendants were sentenced to between 25 and 35 years in prison. They were ordered to pay a collective fine of $1.1 billion.

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