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24 May 2004 by -

A former Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, Pierre-Richard Prosper, was appointed by George W. Bush in May 2001 to the post of Ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues. From Iraq to Rwanda and Sierra Leone to Indonesia, Prosper defends the interests of American diplomacy and monitors all sensitive legal cases. IJT: Will those responsible for the abuse of prisoners in Iraq be prosecuted for war crimes?

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25 July 2005 by -

A US federal court gave the go ahead on 15 July for American military commissions to try a dozen prisoners detained in Guantanamo Bay (see IJT-18). The special commissions, inherited from a system created during World War II to try suspected German saboteurs, impose strict restrictions on the defence. Lawyers for the detainees say they will appeal the decision at the Supreme Court, reports AFP.

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21 November 2005 by -

On November 14, an American federal judge adjourned the proceedings before a military commission in Guantanamo against Australian David Hicks, who was captured in 2001 in Afghanistan. The judge is awaiting a final and ultimate ruling from the Supreme Court, which announced on November 7 that it would rule on the legality of these commissions by March or April 2006. This final appeal was lodged by another accused, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who was arrested at the beginning of 2002. The trial of Hicks, Hamdan and two others began in August 2004.

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07 February 2005 by -

Some defenders of Guantanamo detainees hail it as a «victory». US federal judge Joyce Hens Green ruled on 31 January that the military tribunals for «enemy combatants» are unconstitutional. In a 28 June 2004 ruling, the Supreme Court allowed detainees to mount legal challenges to their continuing detention. The Bush administration responded by expedited proceedings before military tribunals. Judge Green said that the procedures applied by the military commissions (see IJT 18) failed to give the detainees adequate access to material evidence and to legal representation.

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07 February 2005 by Christine Chaumeau

Three years after the creation of the Guantanamo prison, the 550 detainees in the war on terrorism risk filling up American courtrooms. Lawyers and human rights activists are attacking every aspect of the legal strategy set up by the American administration to try so-called enemy combatants. In such a context, the next few months will prove critical for the success or failure of the military commissions.

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10 July 2006 by -

In a 3-5 vote, the United States Supreme Court dealt a harsh blow to the George Bush administration when it ruled on June 29 that it was illegal for "military commissions" to try the Guantanamo detainees, citing a violation of American law and the Geneva Conventions.

Guantanamo