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A medical examining room at the ICTY (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
21 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The on-going controversy over the provisional release of Serbian ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj [IJT-179] from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has recast the spotlight on how courts deal with ailing accused. It also begets a fundamental question: what determines if someone is fit to stand trial?

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20 July 2011 by -

Desperate for cash after years on the run, Goran Hadzic tried to sell a stolen painting believed to be a Modigliani and supplied the vital clue for capturing the last major Yugoslav war crimes fugitive.   

Serbia's president announced the arrest of Hadzic, a Croatian Serb wartime leader indicted for crimes against humanity during the 1991-95 Croatian war, on Wednesday.   

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31 August 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

It's been busy at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) since trials resumed after the summer break.

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03 June 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

There were cries of emotion from Srebrenica survivors in the public gallery when former Bosnian Serb General Ratko Mladic did not enter a plea to charges he called "monstrous" and "obnoxious".

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08 October 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On September 27, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia sentenced Mile Mrksic, former colonel in the Yugoslavian army, to 20 years in prison for aiding and abetting the torture and murder of 200 people, mostly Croats, at the Ovcara farm, near Vukovar, Croatia. Veselin Slivancanin received 5 years in prison for aiding and abetting torture, whereas Captain Miroslav Radic was acquitted, due to lack of evidence. Despite the judges' precautions, the verdict against the "Vukovar Three" provoked outrage among Croats.

Goran Hadzic