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06 November 2006 by -

La justice croate a finalement ordonné, le 23 octobre, l'arrestation du puissant homme politique croate Branimir Glavas, après avoir rejeté à deux reprises les demandes de détention du parquet. Ancien général dans l'armée et l'un des fondateurs du parti HDZ au pouvoir, Glavas est la plus importante autorité croate à faire l'objet d'une instruction en Croatie pour des crimes de guerre commis en 1991, dans son fief d'Osijek, contre des membres de la minorité serbe. Le Parlement a levé son immunité, et Glavas s'est rendu de lui-même à la prison de Zagreb, le 26 octobre.

article
06 November 2006 by -

On 23 October, Croatian judicial authorities finally ordered the arrest of powerful politician Branimir Glavas, after rejecting two previous requests for his detention from the public prosecutor's office. A former army general and one of the founders of the HDZ party currently in power, Glavas is the highestranking Croatian official to be investigated in Croatia for war crimes committed in 1991 against Serbian minorities in his stronghold of Osijek [IJT-51]. After Parliament lifted his immunity, Glavas gave himself up to the Zagreb prison on 26 October.

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22 October 2007 by Drago Hedl

On October 15, Branimir Glavas, a retired Croatian general and long-time head of 1 of the 20 Croatian counties, entered the county court of Zagreb. He is accused of war crimes committed 16 years ago, during the war in former Yugoslavia. Leaning on a cane, this 51-year-old man, usually energetic, seemed weakened. His voice trembled as he greeted his peaceful supporters.

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19 February 2007 by Drago Hedl

Despite the evidence gathered during investigations, in addition to the evidence handed over by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Croatia's political class is in no hurry to try two of its most notorious politicians charged with war crimes: Branimir Glavas, a member of Parliament and retired general, and Tomislav Mercep, former MP and presidential candidate in 2000, even though this is Croatia's main obstacle to European Union (EU) membership.

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24 July 2006 by Drago Hedl

On July 17, an investigation was opened into Branimir Glavas, one of the most influential Croatian politicians in 15 years. A long-term member of Parliament, general in the Croatian army and one of the founders of the Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ), the party of former Croatian President Franjo Tudjman, Glavas is charged with committing war crimes against Serbian civilians from 1991-1992 while he was in charge of defending Osijek, the fourth largest city in Croatia. He may not take the fall alone.

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19 February 2007

Liberians will have to wait for the truth

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in Liberia has indefinitely postponed the public hearings scheduled for January 31. The Commission, which was established under the 2003 Peace Agreement, is facing serious funding problems, while public expectation to see it begin holding hearings of victims and perpetrators is mounting.

Croatia reluctant to prosecute its politicians

Despite the evidence gathered during investigations, in addition to the evidence handed over by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Croatia's political class is in no hurry to try two of its most notorious politicians charged with war crimes: Branimir Glavas, a member of Parliament and retired general, and Tomislav Mercep, former MP and presidential candidate in 2000, even though this is Croatia's main obstacle to European Union (EU) membership.

International justice - new investment opportunity?

Recent gifts by Microsoft to the UN-backed Khmer Rouge Tribunal in Cambodia and a project reintegrating former paramilitaries in Colombia may signal a new era of private sector philanthropy. The burgeoning field of international justice is certainly in need of additional sources of funding, but would corporate contributions come at a hidden cost?

Morocco - From collective pardon to collective amnesia?

One year ago on January 6, 2006, the 17 members of Morocco's Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) were closing up shop after submitting their final report to King Mohammed VI. The Moroccan truth commission had received a flood of compliments from the international community praising the recommendations in its report, especially those advocating legislative and constitutional reforms. One year later, however, the results have been rather mixed.

 

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