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Bosco Ntaganda, for whom the ICC pre-trial chamber unanimously confirmed all charges of sexual and gender-based crimes (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
06 April 2015 by Ella Sonja West, The Hague (The Netherlands)

At the International Criminal Court (ICC), prosecuting sexual and gender-based violence has been notoriously difficult. Documentary evidence has often proved insufficient and local officials, unwilling to cooperate. Despite such challenges, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), since Fatou Bensouda took over in 2012, has prioritized prosecution of such crimes.

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ICC judges in Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui case on a visit to Ituri in January 2012 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
11 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This is the second in a series of articles delving into the challenges faced by prosecutors at the International Criminal Court. In our last issue [IJT-176], Tjitske Lingsma explored why the ICC seems afflicted by untruthful witnesses. In the third article, we examine the growing importance of technological evidence, like phone records and computer data, to reduce the reliance on witness testimony.

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20 June 2012 by -

Entretien avec le juge Bruno Cotte, président de chambre dans le second procès de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI).

par Franck Petit, La Haye*

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25 November 2009 by Sylvere Unen

As the trial of former militiamen Mathieu Ngudjolo and Germain Katanga opened this week at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, residents of their home district of Ituri in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are losing faith in the court. 

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01 October 2009 by -

The International Justice Tribune has published its 90th edition. Read it here.

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30 September 2009 by -

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has rejected a claim by Congolese militia leader Germain Katanga that he should not be prosecuted before the ICC.

By Thijs Bouwknegt, The Hague

Katanga asked that the case be dismissed, arguing that the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was able to prosecute him, and that the ICC prosecutor failed to disclose documents indicating that he was under investigation in the DRC.

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23 January 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

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02 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Commercially motivated pillage has taken on increasing importance in recent years as the illegal exploitation of natural resources has emerged as a primary means of financing conflict. But efforts to hold disreputable commercial actors responsible for war crimes or other serious human rights violations have been frustrated, frequently because of difficulties in proving corporate complicity. Larissa van den Herik of Leiden University organised the conference ‘Corporate War Crimes: Prosecuting Pillage of Natural Resources’ in The Hague last week.

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22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

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14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

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