article
26 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

article
13 April 2011 by -

Dear reader, please find the latest IJT. The next issue will be published April 27th 2011.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 126 (PDF file)

Subscribe to the International Justice Tribune


In this week's issue:

article
13 April 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

Geoffrey Nice, British barrister, is a familiar face in the international legal world. Flamboyant, eloquent and outspoken, he became a well-known courtroom figure as lead prosecutor in the trial of the late Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic at the ICTY. Since then, Nice has represented victims before the ICC and is now representing the government of Kenya, in relation to the ‘Ocampo 6’.

article
06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

article
05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

article
23 May 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Of the 17 charges in the Kosovo indictment against Slobodan Milosevic, the massacre at Racak is the only crime that took place before the NATO bombings of May 1999. At his trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former Serb president is trying to prove that he was fighting a just war in Kosovo against insurgents and terrorists.

article
10 October 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For the last five weeks, at Slobodan Milosevic's invitation, the ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj, former opposition leader and deputy prime minister of Serbia during the war in the former Yugoslavia, has testified in his defence. Since 23 August, Seselj, who is also accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), has presented as facts opinions previously expressed by Milosevic. When the judges asked for evidence, Seselj replied that it existed but that he did not have it.

article
03 December 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From its very creation in May 1993, The Hague-based ICTY was branded the heir of the 1945 Nuremberg tribunal. But while the Nuremberg prosecutors had only Germans in the dock, this new UN court would make a point of not being victor's justice. With the UN Security Council mandate "to maintain and restore international peace and security" came the Tribunal's obligation to investigate and prosecute crimes committed by individuals on all sides of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. The ICTY has done this, but it has not avoided political justice.

Geoffrey Nice