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06 February 2006 by Louis-Martin Rugendo

The start of gacaca trials throughout Rwanda, slated for the beginning of 2006, will be delayed by the local and municipal elections scheduled for February and March, indicated the Rwandan authorities in early January. Inaugurated three years ago, and having opened the first trials nearly a year ago, only 10% of the 10,000 people’s courts have entered the trial phase. Since March 2005, 118 gacaca courts have handed down 4,000 decisions. And while 120,000 prosecution cases are waiting to come before the judges, it is estimated that 700,000 people, nearly a tenth of the population, are currently free but could have to face charges before a gacaca court. But under what circumstances?

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the Holocaust, women conducted medical experiments and guarded concentration camps. During the Rwandan genocide, they managed roadblocks and burned buildings with people inside. Women have been involved in almost every type of mass violence, a recent Dutch study has found. Still, the number who are prosecuted and convicted is significantly lower than men.

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
article
13 January 2010 by -

The 97th edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 97 (PDF file)

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article
13 January 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Fifteen years on, Rwandans are still reliving the genocide. Every week, scores of people around the country attend the community-based Gacaca trials of alleged génocidaires in their communities.

article
19 June 2001 by -

The day after the official launch by President Paul Kagame, inaugural Gacaca court sessions were held on 19 June in 18 of the country's administrative units, called cellules, with at least one in each province. Rwanda

article
01 June 2001 by -

According to Rwandan national opinion, the election of Gacaca court judges was an exemplary ballot, even if minor criticism has come from certain quarters. Rwanda: Election of the « Gacaca » Judges

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17 December 2007 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 80

Table of content:

  • Trials in Peru: First legal blow against Fujimori
  • Rwanda: The mysterious arithmetic of the gacaca courts
  • War Crimes Chamber in Sarajevo: “Assessment” series & Bosnia, the overachieving student

Click here to download the IJT, No. 80

Subscribe for free to the bi-weekly magazine
 

article
09 December 2009 by -

The Rwandan Gacaca courts, initially scheduled to close in June 2009, will now have to finish their work by the end of this year.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The traditional courts were enlisted in 2001 to serve as a vehicle for truth, justice and reconciliation following the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

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31 May 2011 by -

Rwanda's community-based gacaca courts have helped communities confront the country's 1994 genocide but have failed to provide credible decisions and justice in a number of cases, says Human Rights Watch. As the gacaca courts wind down their work, Rwanda should set up specialised units in the national court system to review alleged miscarriages of justice, says the rights organisation.

 

 

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