Frans van Anraat

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20 December 2004 by HEIKELKINA VERRIJN STUART

Dutchman Frans Van Anraat recently declared in a television interview that his deliveries of chemical substances to Iraq was just something he had done on the side. He had received a request from Iraq and had successfully delivered. Had he not done it, somebody else would have, he said. At the time, the Dutch public prosecutor had contemplated charging him with export violations, but since the crimes took place in the late 1980s, it was too late. The crimes would be considered prescriptible. On 6 December, 2004, the businessman was arrested and charged with complicity in genocide and war crimes.

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25 July 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 10 July, a District Court in The Hague extended the custody of Dutch businessman Frans van Anraat for a second three-month period (see IJT-17). The 62-year-old is charged with complicity to commit genocide and war crimes for supplying Saddam Hussein's regime with substances that were allegedly used to produce chemical weapons.

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19 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Dutch prosecutors needed eleven hours on 7 December for their closing arguments against Frans van Anraat, the Dutch citizen accused of complicity in genocide on trial before a federal court in The Hague for his sales of chemicals to the Saddam Hussein regime in the 1980's. After a three-week trial, the prosecution requested the maximum prison sentence of 15 years. The prosecutor argued that the 63- year old Dutchman had known that the thousands of tons of thiodiglycol (TDG) he supplied were converted to chemical weapons, which Iraq used to attack Iran and its own Kurdish population.

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04 February 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The appeals arguments in the trial of Frans van Anraat will be held at The Hague from April 4-25. On December 23, 2005 a Dutch court sentenced the 65 year-old businessman to 15 years in prison for complicity in war crimes committed by former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, his cousin Ali Hassan al- Majid and his son in law Hussein Kamal al-Majid. Both parties are challenging the lower court's judgment and legal reasoning.