François Roux

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14 October 2009 by Franck Petit

Appointed to a three-year term by the United Nations Secretary General last March, the French lawyer François Roux will take up his new role as head of the Defence Office at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) at the end of this month. During his 30-year career as an international lawyer, Roux has spent ten years working with international criminal tribunals. 

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09 December 2009 by Thierry Cruvellier

“Do I infer that the accused is seeking an acquittal?” asked Judge Cartwright.
“I did say that. Release means an acquittal,” responded Cambodian defence counsel Kar Savuth.

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20 December 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

At the beginning of the New Year, if the judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) stick to the terms of the agreement between the defence and the prosecutor, Vincent Rutaganira can consider himself a lucky man. On 8 December, the former district councillor of a small town in western Rwanda not only became the fourth Rwandan to plead guilty before a UN court. He will also be distinguished by the unprecedented conditions in which the prosecutor accepted his confession. 

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07 November 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

On May 12, 2005, the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) discreetly handed down two decisions that illustrate an important difference between the UN tribunal in Arusha and The Hague-based tribunal that is responsible for trying cases of crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia. At the beginning of December 2004 the first motions for early release from persons convicted by the ICTR were brought before Judge Erik Mose. The two motions were filed by men who had pleaded guilty and cooperated with the prosecutor's office on an ongoing basis as informants or witnesses. Both motions were denied.

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16 September 2009 by Thierry Cruvellier

Victims attending the trial of Kaing Guek Eav – a.k.a. Duch – were outraged when, on August 27th, the court’s trial chamber challenged their participation in the final phase of the trial.

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10 September 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée

Sixty-five-year-old Kaing Kek Ieu, alias Duch, was indicted for crimes against humanity on July 31 by the investigating judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) and placed in custody in one of eight newly opened cells. Of the five suspects identified by the prosecutor in July, Duch is the only one to be officially known, indicted, and detained.

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03 December 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 20, a day after the arrest of former Khmer Rouge president, Khieu Samphan, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) held its first public hearing in the Duch case. It was a legal christening marked by a debate on the prolonged detention of the accused and, for the public who came to watch, by the amateur televising of the events.