extradition

issue
Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
article
A UN peacekeeper patrols the Beni region in eastern DRC, near the Ugandan border (Flickr/UN Photo/Sylvain Liechti)
17 May 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

The dispute between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) over Jamil Mukulu, leader of Uganda’s Islamist rebel group the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) who was arrested last month in Tanzania, has exposed a lack of concerted regional effort in pursuing justice and accountability.