echr

article
28 September 2011 by Mark Schenkel

The Netherlands is lobbying the European Court of Human Rights to allow the extradition of genocide suspects living in Europe to Rwanda, International Justice Tribune has learned. 

article
24 February 2010 by Maria Morina

“The government does not understand that [we] should be working for them, not against them”, says Tatyana Kasatkina, Executive Director of Memorial, a human rights research centre based in Moscow. It was founded towards the end of the Soviet era with the goal of preserving the societal memory of political persecution and oppression. Today it works in post-Soviet states, monitoring human rights and helping “to promote mature civil society and democracy based on the rule of law.” Kasatkina spoke to the IJT at her office in Moscow. 

article
03 November 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

Reforms are desperately needed by the European Court of Human Rights – the supra-national court for citizens in 47 countries, which belong to the Council of Europe. It is based on the European Convention on Human Rights – the only international human rights agreement that provides the individual with a high degree of protection.

article
05 July 2004 by our correspondent

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

issue
30 November 1999

ICC joins the Congolese chess game

​On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

Five Rwandan files kept on the back burner

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

issue
09 November 2011

Summary:

STL: in absentia - the only way?

The first hearing trials in absentia under international law will take place before the UN-backed Special Tribunal for Lebanon on November 11. The defence and the prosecution will present arguments on moving into absentia proceedings. The STL is the anomaly in the family of international courts. Its Statute is the only one that permits trials in absentia. This marks a significant departure from current practice and procedure in relation to international law. But there is no convincing justification for this yet, say experts.

Green light - Sweden to Rwanda genocide extradition

The long-awaited judgement in the case of Ahorugeze v Sweden was delivered by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on 27 October. Judges decided that Sylvere Ahorugeze’s extradition to Rwanda would not breach the European Convention on Human Rights: his extradition would not expose him to a real risk of ill-treatment (Article 3) and it conformed with his rights to a fair trial, guaranteed by Article 6.

Guilty - Argentina dirty war commanders

A historic ruling convicting 16 people accused of crimes against humanity was handed down by a Federal Court in Buenos Aires on October 26. They were convicted of arbitrary detention, torture and unlawful killing, committed at the Naval Mechanical by rocketsaler">School (ESMA) during the military dictatorship that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983.

Reconciliation or prosecution in Ivory Coast?

A situation without precedent in a country that seems to have returned to normal. But where hate and anger have yet to disappear completely. Healing the wounds after post-electoral violence in 2010/2011 is the new mandate of the Commission for Dialogue, Truth and Reconciliation (CDVR). Meanwhile, the International Criminal Court (ICC) is conducting its investigations in the same country.

ECHR: power to the people

Reforms are desperately needed by the European Court of Human Rights – the supra-national court for citizens in 47, which belongs to the Council of Europe. It is based on the European Convention on Human Rights – the only international human rights agreement that provides the individual with a high degree of protection.