Duch

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24 September 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée

The eighty-one-year-old former right hand man of Khmer Rouge number one Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, was arrested in Pailin at dawn on September 19 and taken by helicopter to the Cambodian capital. He was brought before the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), which are tasked with trying the most important Khmer Rouge leaders who ruled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. Nuon Chea is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes.

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24 February 2010 by Jared Ferie

When the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) hands down its first verdict in the coming weeks, it will be a landmark for a tribunal mired in allegations of political interference. It will also be a judgment on a man who admitted responsibility for torture and killings at a Khmer Rouge prison he ran, but simultaneously argued that he was following orders he could not reject.

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11 October 2011 by Christian Chartier

A brilliant book by Thierry Cruvellier! Available in French - but one only can hope it will soon be translated into Khmer, English and other languages. With all due respect to the writer’s sharp pen and underlying albeit biting irony. His work reads like a novel. However, this is no fiction – unfortunately: the some 12,000 people who died in the infamous S-21 prison, managed by Duch, are real.

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09 December 2009 by Thierry Cruvellier

“Do I infer that the accused is seeking an acquittal?” asked Judge Cartwright.
“I did say that. Release means an acquittal,” responded Cambodian defence counsel Kar Savuth.

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23 December 2009 by Jared Ferrie

In the shade of trees draping over the schoolyard, 3,000 students sit on sheets of newspaper, in crisp white shirts and black skirts or slacks. They wait patiently for the ceremony to end, then teachers walk between the neat rows handing out textbooks – the first in Cambodia’s history to document the Khmer Rouge in detail.

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21 June 2011 by Jared Ferrie

Thirty-two years after the fall of one of the 20th century’s bloodiest regimes, a tribunal in Cambodia will begin trying the four most senior Khmer Rouge leaders still alive. But the trial commences under a cloud of controversy, with observers questioning the UN-backed court’s independence.

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13 April 2011 by Thierry Cruvellier

March 28: The first time the appeals bench of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) appears in public session. The learned assembly of nine judges, sitting behind eighteen flat computer screens, curves like a spine.

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16 September 2009 by Thierry Cruvellier

Victims attending the trial of Kaing Guek Eav – a.k.a. Duch – were outraged when, on August 27th, the court’s trial chamber challenged their participation in the final phase of the trial.

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06 February 2006 by Anne-Laure Porée

Just as judges are about to be appointed to the Extraordinary Chambers to try former Khmer Rouge leaders of Cambodia, the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) is preparing to hand over to the prosecutors information it has collected over the past ten years. DC-Cam was first established in 1995 at Yale University in the United States to collect documentation on the Khmer Rouge so as to explain history and establish responsibility for crimes committed. It has been operating in Phnom Penh since 1997 under the leadership of Youk Chhang, a former survivor. Chhang and his center will be playing a crucial role in the preparation of future trials. 

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23 July 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée and Chheang Bopha

On July 18, the prosecutors communicated their introductory submission to the investigating judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) responsible for trying former Khmer Rouge leaders. Five of them are suspected of having "committed, aided and abetted, or borne superior responsibility" for 25 separate acts of "murder, torture, forcible transfer, unlawful detention, forced labor, and religious, political, and ethnic persecution." Though their names remain officially confidential before arrest, they have already been cited by observers: Duch, Nuon Chea, Ieng Sary, Khieu Samphan and Ieng Thirith.

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