article
02 April 2007 by Ivan Slobod

The first case under Canada’s Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act (2000) opened at the main courthouse in Montreal on March 26, 2007. The defendant, who has been in custody since being arrested in Toronto nearly eighteen months ago, walked into the courtroom more nattily attired than any previous occupant of the prisoner’s box. Désiré Munyaneza, a Rwandan charged with genocide, wore a color-coordinated suit, shirt and tie. He looked around, spotting his wife, other family members, attorneys and the single judge.

article
11 November 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

As the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) prepares to close its doors in Tanzania, courts around the world are taking up the task of trying suspected Rwandan génocidaires. They do so under the principle of Universal Jurisdiction: a doctrine that allows prosecutors to reach beyond national borders in cases of torture, war crimes or genocide committed elsewhere. 
 

article
24 October 2005 by -

Five years after Canada established a special office to investigate war criminals and passed specific legislation in this respect, the Canadian judiciary announced on October 19 that it had initiated its first legal proceedings under this legislation. Désiré Munyaneza, a 39-year old native from the south of Rwanda, is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes for crimes committed in 1994 in Butare, a region in southern Rwanda. Arrested in Toronto, where he was living, Munyaneza appeared before a court sitting in Montreal.

article
21 January 2008 by Ivan Slobod

During its opening statement on January 7, after a seven-month adjournment, Desire Munyaneza's defense team announced that it will demonstrate that witnesses for the prosecution concocted their evidence against him. The Rwandan man is on trial in Montreal for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed in Rwanda in 1994.

article
23 July 2007 by Ivan Slobod

Enter room 5.01 at the Montreal Courthouse and abandon all illusion: Desire Munyaneza's trial has little chance of changing the face of international criminal justice. Though the Rwandan has been charged with the most serious crimes the international community has yet defined - genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes - his scope of responsibility is limited, and the case is not being tried well.

issue
02 April 2007

Canada unveils universal jurisdiction

The first case under Canada’s Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act (2000) opened at the main courthouse in Montreal on March 26, 2007. The defendant, who has been in custody since being arrested in Toronto nearly eighteen months ago, walked into the courtroom more nattily attired than any previous occupant of the prisoner’s box. Désiré Munyaneza, a Rwandan charged with genocide, wore a color-coordinated suit, shirt and tie. He looked around, spotting his wife, other family members, attorneys and the single judge.

Trial of political leaders running aground

One of the most important trials before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has again run into difficulty following the withdrawal of a judge for health reasons. Nine years after the arrest of the three defendants—leaders of the former presidential party (MRND) who are among the prime suspects in the 1994 genocide—the trial is unlikely to finish before 2008, the completion date set by the UN Security Council for all ICTR trials.

Van Anraat, a high-stakes second round

The appeals arguments in the trial of Frans van Anraat will be held at The Hague from April 4-25. On December 23, 2005 a Dutch court sentenced the 65 year-old businessman to 15 years in prison for complicity in war crimes committed by former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, his cousin Ali Hassan al- Majid and his son in law Hussein Kamal al-Majid. Both parties are challenging the lower court's judgment and legal reasoning.

Brief news:

• COLOMBIA

Ernesto Baez at confession

"Parabusiness" scandal revealed

• SIERRA LEONE

Registrar of the court dismissed

• INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

Lubanga's defense demands appropriate means

 

Desire Munyaneza