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28 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Uhuru Kenyatta is sure his file at the International Criminal Court does not contain anything that implicates him in crimes against humanity. “We go to The Hague in the full expectation that justice will prevail and the truth emerges. We are innocent,” he said ahead of a series of hearings that may bring him to trial. 

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22 November 2004 by -

There has been a new twist to the chaotic so-called «Government I» trial. A year after it opened before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), the trial was ordered to start again from scratch before a new panel of judges. Now the news agency Hirondelle reports that the prosecution has asked for one of the accused, André Rwamakuba, to be tried separately. The prosecutor says he wants the case to «focus on the conspiracy within the MRND», the former presidential party, of which Rwamakuba was not a member.

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06 December 2004 by our correspondent

Nothing seems to be going right for the Government I trial at the Arusha Tribunal. The trial, which began a year ago, was adjourned after six months, and then, in October, the Appeals Chamber ordered it to start again from scratch before a new panel of judges. Today, it is the focus of renewed battles between defence teams and the prosecutor's office.

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18 December 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

"For the Court the procedural problems have really started now," ICTY Registrar Hans Holthuis commented on Friday December 8. Vojislav Seselj, president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) and one of the most prominent defendants before the Hague-based court, has just ended the hunger strike he began twenty-eight days ago to protest his Court-imposed lawyer and maintain the right to defend himself. The Appeals Chamber upheld his right.

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06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".

David Hooper