David Crane

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08 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The prosecution closing argument is scheduled on May 8 in the trial of Guus Kouwenhoven, which opened April 24 before a Hague-based court. The 63-year old Dutch businessman is charged with war crimes and selling weapons to Charles Taylor in Liberia from 2001 to 2003, in violation of a UN arms embargo. Having concluded the Frans van Anraat trial in December 2005, the Dutch judicial system is continuing its efforts to prosecute those who are deriving financial profit from war crimes.

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29 March 2005 by KELVIN LEWIS

The third and last scheduled trial at the Special Court for Sierra Leone finally got underway on 7 March. The three men in the dock are former members of the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council (AFRC): Alex Tamba Brima, Brima Bazzy Kamara and Santigie Borbor Kanu. They faced the three foreign judges after spending nearly two years in detention. On stage for perhaps the last time was court prosecutor David Crane, two weeks after announcing he will be stepping down in July after three years at the head of the prosecution.

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27 June 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

After serving three years as chief prosecutor at the Special Court for Sierra Leone, David Crane will be leaving his post on 30 June. On 25 and 26 June, he chaired a work session in Freetown with the prosecutors of the International Criminal Court [ICC] and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda [ICTR] and the deputy prosecutor of the Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia [ICTY]. In an interview given to International Justice Tribune on the eve of the meeting, Crane reflected on the lessons learnt from the Sierra Leone experience. He said that the investigations into businessmen involved in the conflict are still ongoing and assured that it is only a matter of time before Nigeria arrests Charles Taylor and hands him over to the Special Court.

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10 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

This week the UN Security Council may ask the Netherlands to host the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established four years ago in Freetown, so that it can try its most important defendant, former Liberian president Charles Taylor, who has been incarcerated since March 29. Officially, security is the reason cited for this relocation, which would bring an end to the " Sierra Leonean model. " More than likely though, it is the result of a political agreement.

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04 June 2007 by Sylvain Savolainen

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's trial will open before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) on June 4. The Court has been relocated to the Hague [IJT-44] to try the case, which will be both its most important trial and its last. The Special Court, which was created in 2002, was expected to last just three years. In the end, it will have taken eight years to try nine individuals. And the jury is still out as to whether the Court will live up to expectations.

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24 August 2010 by Bram Posthumus

Former Liberian president Charles Taylor, is in court to defend himself on 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity he allegedly committed in Liberia’s neighbour to the west, Sierra Leone. Liberian media cover the trial extensively but Liberians are, to all intents and purposes, mere spectators. This trial is not about them. Liberia lacks a war crimes tribunal. What it does have is a Truth and Reconciliation Commission which has been taking countless statements from war crimes victims and perpetrators and whose report is in the public domain.