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27 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The International Criminal Court’s (ICC) first status conference was held in camera on 15 March. It was convened to provide an update on the prosecutor’s investigations in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). No information has filtered through on talks between the judges and Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo on this subject. But there have been strong echoes of a legal culture clash and the boundaries of responsibility between the pre-trial chamber and the prosecution.

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19 December 2005 by Franck Petit

Interview with Claude Jorda, judge at the International Criminal Court

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06 November 2006 by Pierre Hazan

France's attitude towards international criminal justice is marked by ambiguity. Paris subscribes to a vision of the world in which international humanitarian law is considered a way to curb violence against civilian populations, but at the same time it is wary of an unchecked judicial system that could end up prosecuting French soldiers engaged in areas where it has old and deep-rooted interests.

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05 March 2007 by Franck Petit

Law professor at the University of Florence in Italy and the first president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Antonio Cassese presided over the United Nation's Commission of Inquiry on Darfur. The Commission's January 25, 2005 report led to the referral of the case to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In this interview, Cassese reacts to ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo's February 27 announcement of the initial results from his Darfur investigation.

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13 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first international tribunal to allow victims to actively participate. The trial chamber's January 17 ruling allows six victims to get involved at a very early stage of the proceedings - during the investigations that the ICC is conducting in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). On January 23, the prosecutor filed an application for leave to appeal this decision he strongly opposes. From his point of view, "the broad scope of victim participation envisioned creates a serious imbalance between victims and any future accused persons", and admitting them at the investigation stage could lead the chamber to "premature and inappropriate factual conclusions".

Claude Jorda