Charles Taylor

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08 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The prosecution closing argument is scheduled on May 8 in the trial of Guus Kouwenhoven, which opened April 24 before a Hague-based court. The 63-year old Dutch businessman is charged with war crimes and selling weapons to Charles Taylor in Liberia from 2001 to 2003, in violation of a UN arms embargo. Having concluded the Frans van Anraat trial in December 2005, the Dutch judicial system is continuing its efforts to prosecute those who are deriving financial profit from war crimes.

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25 August 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Hermione Gee

For more than a year Charles Taylor’s trial has taken place in relative obscurity. But since fashion model Naomi Campbell and actress Mia Farrow were asked to give evidence about a diamond Mr Taylor was alleged to have given to Campbell that has all changed. The IJT asked lead defense counsel for Mr Taylor, Courtenay Griffiths, about the challenges of conducting such a case under the spotlight.

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16 February 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

His pen and notepad were already neatly packed, ready to leave the courtroom. But the judges ordered him to sit down, and two guards saw to it that the once-feared Charles Taylor witnessed the final stages of his trial for war crimes. But after the morning coffee break, the former Liberian president didn’t show up and decided to stay away for the rest of the week.

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28 September 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The judgement in the high-profile trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor is expected within months. Taylor is the first African former head of state to stand trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity. He has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Charles Taylor was one of Africa’s most feared warlords. He fled Liberia in 2003 and is on trial before the Special Court for Sierra Leone, sitting in Leidschendam. He is accused of supporting Revolutionary United Front (RUF) rebels during the civil war in neighbouring Sierra Leone during the 1990s. 

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24 March 2010 by Bram Posthumus

War ended in Liberia almost seven years ago. It has left scars in the land and the people. The country is slowly recovering and questions regarding justice and impunity are being addressed – but not to everyone’s satisfaction.

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14 March 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

“Throw it in the bin. That is what we submit the court should do with this body of evidence: Get rid of it. We submit it’s garbage.” That was the message of Charles Taylor’s lawyers during closing arguments at the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). And besides, they said, “why is Colonel Muammer Gaddafi not in the dock?”

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20 September 2004 by our correspondent

Human Rights Watch (HRW), in its report published on 8 September, urges the Special Court for Sierra Leone not to limit its prosecution to the thirteen people it has indicted so far (of who only nine are in custody).

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30 September 2009 by John Kollie

The appearance of former Liberian president Charles Taylor before the United Nations backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) in The Hague is generating huge interest and excitement in his home country.

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30 September 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

For the last two months, former Liberian president Charles Taylor has been testifying in his own defence before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). But despite an initial flurry of coverage, the public gallery and pressroom have been virtually empty for most of that time. As the court heads for a three-week recess starting October 5th, the IJT takes a look at the defence strategy thus far.

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18 October 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

For those who have followed the tribulations of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for almost three years, its official report, which was published on 5 October, constitutes a small miracle. No one could have predicted such a logically structured, abundantly detailed, and well-written report two years ago when the Commission almost dissolved itself through sheer negligence. Even a year ago when the report was first due out, hopes for a turnaround were not high.

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