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08 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The prosecution closing argument is scheduled on May 8 in the trial of Guus Kouwenhoven, which opened April 24 before a Hague-based court. The 63-year old Dutch businessman is charged with war crimes and selling weapons to Charles Taylor in Liberia from 2001 to 2003, in violation of a UN arms embargo. Having concluded the Frans van Anraat trial in December 2005, the Dutch judicial system is continuing its efforts to prosecute those who are deriving financial profit from war crimes.

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25 August 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt & Hermione Gee

For more than a year Charles Taylor’s trial has taken place in relative obscurity. But since fashion model Naomi Campbell and actress Mia Farrow were asked to give evidence about a diamond Mr Taylor was alleged to have given to Campbell that has all changed. The IJT asked lead defense counsel for Mr Taylor, Courtenay Griffiths, about the challenges of conducting such a case under the spotlight.

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16 February 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

His pen and notepad were already neatly packed, ready to leave the courtroom. But the judges ordered him to sit down, and two guards saw to it that the once-feared Charles Taylor witnessed the final stages of his trial for war crimes. But after the morning coffee break, the former Liberian president didn’t show up and decided to stay away for the rest of the week.

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28 September 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The judgement in the high-profile trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor is expected within months. Taylor is the first African former head of state to stand trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity. He has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Charles Taylor was one of Africa’s most feared warlords. He fled Liberia in 2003 and is on trial before the Special Court for Sierra Leone, sitting in Leidschendam. He is accused of supporting Revolutionary United Front (RUF) rebels during the civil war in neighbouring Sierra Leone during the 1990s. 

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24 March 2010 by Bram Posthumus

War ended in Liberia almost seven years ago. It has left scars in the land and the people. The country is slowly recovering and questions regarding justice and impunity are being addressed – but not to everyone’s satisfaction.

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26 October 2011 by -

Luis Moreno Ocampo has been the face of the permanent court that hunts for war criminals and 'génocidaires' around the world. But his nine-year term comes to an end in June and his current deputy might follow in his footsteps.

By Thijs Bouwknegt, The Hague

The 50-year-old Gambian Fatou Bensouda is now deputy prosecutor at the ICC. But on Tuesday she was shortlisted as a candidate to replace Ocampo whose contract cannot be renewed.

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20 April 2010 by -

The Dutch Supreme Court has overturned the acquittal of businessman Guus Kouwenhoven who is accused of supplying arms to former Liberian President Charles Taylor. The Court has ordered a retrial.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

According to the Supreme Court, the prosecutor should have had the opportunity to hear two anonymous witnesses from the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL), which is trying Charles Taylor in The Hague. 

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24 March 2010 by -

The 102nd edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 102 (PDF file)

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IJT 102 contents: 

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13 January 2010 by -

Prosecutors at the Special Court for Sierra Leone resumed their cross-examination of former Liberian president Charles Taylor on Monday. Taylor has been testifying in his own defence since July, 2009.

By Thijs Bouwknegt, The Hague

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10 February 2010 by -

A federal judge in the American state of Florida has ordered the son of former Liberian president Charles Taylor to pay $22.4 million to five people tortured during Liberia’s civil war.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The Liberian plaintiffs sued Charles McArthur Emmanuel, also known as “Chuckie” Taylor, shortly after he was sentenced to 97 years in prison for his role in one of Africa’s bloodiest civil wars. He was the first person to be convicted by a US federal court of torture committed outside the United States.

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