Charles Blé Goudé

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Former Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo at the opening of his ICC trial in January 2016 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
05 July 2016 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Twelve witnesses over the past five months: the ICC’s case against former Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo and his supporter Charles Blé Goudé is not getting up to speed. Already, it is lost in discussions on history, suffers from a lack of evidence tying him directly to the crimes and has slowly moved into closed-door hearings.

When the International Criminal Court’s new building [IJT-189] was officially inaugurated by the Dutch King last April, the celebratory ceremony ended with a performance of children singing Michael Jackson’s “Heal the World”. Three months earlier, there was a totally different atmosphere. On 28 January 2016, you could hear the swelling hymns of the crowd: “Libérez Gbagbo! Libérez Gbagbo! Libérez Gbagbo! (Free Gbagbo)” they chanted. Outside the guarded entrance, armed with megaphones, drums and banners, Ivoirians from the diaspora community in Europe had assembled to demand the release of the man they still consider to be their President: Laurent Gbagbo. Inside, while the court clerk read out the charges, some of the spectators sizzled, others burst out in sardonic laughter. They rejoiced in faith and uttered praises when Gbagbo and his companion in the dock, alleged mouthpiece, spin-doctor and ‘street general,’ Charles Blé Goudé, plead not guilty.

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Ivorian ex-president Laurent Gbabgo at his confirmation of charges hearing at the ICC in February 2013 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
27 January 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

As the International Criminal Court (ICC) prepares to try its first former head of state when Ivory Coast's ex-president Laurent Gbagbo goes on trial in The Hague Thursday many question if the ICC is balanced in trying only the leadership of one side in the post-electoral violence.
 

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11 September 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

Four years ago, on September 19, 2002, an aborted coup d'état attempt plunged Côte d'Ivoire into civil war and political violence. In October 2003, Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo sent a document to The Hague acknowledging the International Criminal Court's (ICC) jurisdiction over the crimes committed in Côte d'Ivoire since September 2002. The Court finally confirmed the existence of this document in February 2005. However, one and a half years later, and despite several detailed investigations by the UN and NGOs, the ICC prosecutor is "still questioning whether crimes were committed, analyzing the issues of jurisdiction and admissibility, and trying to determine whether the interests of justice would be served by opening an investigation," according to the ICC's report to the UN Assembly General in August. 

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04 April 2014 by IJT
Charles Blé Goudé, the 42 year old former charismatic head of the Youth Patriots, a pro-Gbagbo movement, introduced himself as a 'consultant in political communication' during his first appearance before the International Criminal Court (ICC), on 27 March. Transferred from Ivory Coast five days before, he has joined in The Netherlands the ex-president Laurent Gbagbo, who has been held for two years.
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25 June 2014 by IJT

Three years after his arrest in Abidjan, the former president of Ivory Coast received confirmation, on 12 June, that he will be tried by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. 

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04 April 2014

Links to articles and PDF of IJT 156