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07 February 2005 by THIERRY CRUVELLIER WITH OUR CORRESPONDENTS IN THE HAGUE AND ARUSHA

The 31 December 2004 marked the official end of investigations at the two UN courts for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Thus, it is now possible to make a preliminary accounting of the Tribunal's records of indictments.

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14 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

There is no doubt in the minds of donors backing the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY): all trials must be completed by 2008. The ICTY prosecutor has now seriously begun tackling the process of transferring cases to local courts, with 8 requests for transferral involving 16 accused submitted to the judges.

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07 February 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Slobodan Milosevic sounded almost jubilant when he called two French witnesses, both former UNPROFOR members sympathetic to the suffering of the Serb people. Nurse Eve Crepin's testimony was so general that presiding judge Patrick Robinson dismissed it as "a conversation with a cup of tea on the veranda". But her partner, former army doctor Patrick Barriot, gave evidence that sparked intense questioning from both prosecutors and judges.

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25 August 2010 by -

Judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia have ordered an independent investigation following complaints from witnesses that they have been intimidated by prosecutors.

Although the probe was ordered in late June, it only resurfaced when the matter was raised recently by a journalist at a news conference.

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19 November 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 8, thirteen years ago, the United Nations Security Council created the ICTR to try those primarily responsible for the serious crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994. Representatives of the Arusha tribunal promise it will have finished its first instance trials by the end of 2008, except for one, which will be completed in 2009. Two uncertainties still weigh on the ICTR: its ability to transfer some of the accused to national courts and the 14 fugitives. But most of all, the ICTR continues to mourn its most serious failure: the absence of proceedings against the winners of the war.

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17 March 2008 by Victor Peskin

The long-running diplomatic battle over Kosovo's future has had a contentious parallel in a courtroom battle over Kosovo's bloody past at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). A judgment in the trial of the former Prime Minister of Kosovo and former Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) commander Ramush Haradinaj is expected soon in The Hague. It may bring new lessons on the relationship between international tribunals and international organizations that would appear to be their natural allies.

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04 February 2008 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

With Kosovo on the brink of declaring its independence from Serbia, the case against its resistance hero former Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj came to an end on January 23 before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

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03 December 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From its very creation in May 1993, The Hague-based ICTY was branded the heir of the 1945 Nuremberg tribunal. But while the Nuremberg prosecutors had only Germans in the dock, this new UN court would make a point of not being victor's justice. With the UN Security Council mandate "to maintain and restore international peace and security" came the Tribunal's obligation to investigate and prosecute crimes committed by individuals on all sides of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. The ICTY has done this, but it has not avoided political justice.

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05 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

After four and a half years of proceedings, the trial of Vojislav Seselj will open at The Hague on November 7. For the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) represents the most important political figure to be tried since the death of former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic in March 2006. One year ago, the appeals chamber confirmed that Seselj had the right to self representation. But since then, the accused has refused to supply information regarding his financial situation and the tribunal is refusing to reimburse his defense fees.

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26 June 2006 by Massimo Moratti and Berber Hettinga

Ten years after being indicted, all the persons charged by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) for crimes committed in Foca in 1992 are now behind bars. The last defendant to be tried, Dragan Zelenovic, was arrested in Siberia in August 2005 and transferred to The Hague on June 8. After much controversy between the ICTY and Russia, Zelenovic had to stopover in Sarajevo, which is where the ICTY will probably want to return him.

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