Bruno Cathala

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06 September 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

At the same time as the International Criminal Court (ICC) launches its first investigations in Uganda and Congo, the annual Assembly of States parties will be meeting in The Hague from 6 to 10 September. The legal and political body faces the tough challenge of deciding on the 2005 budget. Since the court is beginning to schedule its first trials, this is a critical task.

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20 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. It was a success for those who feared funding cuts. But many participants bitterly lamented the lack of passion that marked the week's meeting.

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24 April 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

When Dutch ad hoc defence counsel Tjarda van der Spoel, who was assigned to the DRC case on August 1, 2005, arrived at the ICC building in The Hague, he was not too sure what his role would be. He had to hand in his passport to get an ICC badge and was accompanied throughout the building by a security guard. He did not have a room where he could hang his coat and put on his robe. For reasons of confidentiality he was not allowed to electronically file submissions from outside the building. But, Van der Spoel told IJT, "everybody I met in the huge white building on Maanweg was friendly enough and willing to cooperate."

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.