Biljana Plavsic

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the Holocaust, women conducted medical experiments and guarded concentration camps. During the Rwandan genocide, they managed roadblocks and burned buildings with people inside. Women have been involved in almost every type of mass violence, a recent Dutch study has found. Still, the number who are prosecuted and convicted is significantly lower than men.

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
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09 October 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On September 27, sixty-one year old Momcilo Krajisnik, president of the Assembly of Bosnian Serbs from 1991-1995, was sentenced to 27 years in prison by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for crimes against humanity. He was acquitted on the charge of genocide. Would the judges have ruled differently if his indictment had covered the Srebrenica massacre - a crime that has led to the only two genocide convictions before the ICTY?

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18 February 2008 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On March 10, 2008, almost two years to the day after former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic died, the trial of Jovica Stanisic and Franko "Frenki" Simatovic is expected to start before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). But this trial, which could help establish the link between Belgrade and the Bosnian Serbs who perpetrated the Srebrenica massacre, is likely to be something of a sideshow.