article
09 May 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

On 9 May, four years after the trial of the "Butare four", Belgium reopened the Rwandan genocide file with the trial of two businessmen from Kibungo, Étienne Nzabonimana and Samuel Ndashikirwa. Other proceedings are expected to follow, including the long-awaited trial of Major Bernard Ntuyahaga, suspected of involvement in the death of ten Belgian peacekeepers in Kigali on 7 April 1994. But the most secret and spectacular of all is the pending trial of a certain Ephrem Nkezabera, former banker and a member of the national committee of the Interahamwe militia.

article
24 September 2007 by Benoît Francès

On September 11, the Court of Assises in Brussels awarded 575,070 euros in reparation to 21 Rwandan civil parties out of nearly 150 represented at the trial of Major Bernard Ntuyahaga. On July 5, Ntuyahaga was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the murder of 10 Belgian UN peacekeepers at the start of the genocide in Kigali. However, the Rwandan victims are not about to receive their compensation award any time soon.

article
16 April 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan army, will be tried starting April 19 before a court of Rwanda's former colonial power. For the Belgian justice system, this third universal jurisdiction trial for crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994 is the result of twelve years of efforts to try one of those it holds responsible for the murder of ten Belgian UN soldiers on April 7, 1994. For the accused, it is above all the end of a long drawn-out legal process.

article
18 June 2007 by Benoît Francès

"Was there a genocide? You'd have to ask a specialist. I'm a military man; it's too much to ask of me." Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan Armed Forces (FAR), sometimes gave irritated half answers in response to questions from the judges of the Court of Assises in Brussels. In the troubled hours following the attack on President Juvénal Habyarimana's plane on the evening of April 6, 1994, this G4 army officer (logistics) seemed a stranger to the events. "A ghost in Kigali," quipped presiding judge Karin Gérard.

article
16 April 2007 by Franck Petit

An expert on the three days following the April 6, 1994 attack on the plane of President Juvénal Habyarimana in Kigali, Filip Reyntjens has already testified before the Tanzanian judges "to prevent Bernard Ntuyahaga from being extradited to Rwanda." He will be cited by the prosecution as an expert witness in the trial that is opening in Brussels.

issue
18 June 2007

Ntuyahaga: political trial for a ghost

"Was there a genocide? You'd have to ask a specialist. I'm a military man; it's too much to ask of me." Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan Armed Forces (FAR), sometimes gave irritated half answers in response to questions from the judges of the Court of Assises in Brussels. In the troubled hours following the attack on President Juvénal Habyarimana's plane on the evening of April 6, 1994, this G4 army officer (logistics) seemed a stranger to the events. "A ghost in Kigali," quipped presiding judge Karin Gérard.

Israel cornered by Occupied Territories

After the genocide of the Jews during the Second World Ward and since the 1950s, Israel has been actively engaged in the project for an international criminal court. In Rome, in 1998, its leaders hoped to be able to adhere to the Rome Statute creating the International Criminal Court (ICC). But the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians - and the continued existence of settlements in the Occupied Territories, which puts Israel at risk of being accused by the court - decided otherwise.

Brief news:

• Sierra Leone: Taylor's trail opens without him

• Cambodia: The Khmer Rouge tribunal finally adopts its internal rules

• Lebanon: Will new attacks go before the Special Court?

• ICTY: 35 years for Martic

 

issue
16 April 2007

No more waiting for Bernard Ntuyahaga

Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan army, will be tried starting April 19 before a court of Rwanda's former colonial power. For the Belgian justice system, this third universal jurisdiction trial for crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994 is the result of twelve years of efforts to try one of those it holds responsible for the murder of ten Belgian UN soldiers on April 7, 1994. For the accused, it is above all the end of a long drawn-out legal process.

The trial of an "extremely important event"

An expert on the three days following the April 6, 1994 attack on the plane of President Juvénal Habyarimana in Kigali, Filip Reyntjens has already testified before the Tanzanian judges "to prevent Bernard Ntuyahaga from being extradited to Rwanda." He will be cited by the prosecution as an expert witness in the trial that is opening in Brussels.

India non-aligned, but held back by insurgencies

India was an active participant at the Rome conference that created the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 1998. Much of its interest was linked to the legacy of the country's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, who had a vision of nations not allied with major power blocs. An international court that is not beholden to such blocs has some appeal in India. But issues of sovereignty, internal insurgencies and India's aspiration to have a permanent seat at the UN Security Council made it not signing the ICC Statute.

Brief news:

Canada

• The Rwandan defendant attacked in jail

• Finland prepares to try a Rwandan suspect

Former Yugoslavia

• "Scorpions" sentenced in Serbia

• ICTY: Lukic trial transfered to Sarajevo

Peru

• Washington spurs on Peruvian justice

 

Bernard Ntuyahaga