article
04 May 2010 by -

Belgian lawmakers voted overwhelmingly on Thursday to ban wearing the Islamic burqa or niqab in public. Other European countries might follow suit.

By Lula Ahrens

In the lower house of the Belgian federal parliament, 136 deputies voted for a nationwide ban. There were no abstentions, and no one voted against the bill. The ban will be imposed in all public spaces.

article
21 January 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 81

Table of content:

  • Trials in Belgium: The risks of a genocide trial
  • Truth Commission in Liberia: Liberians exhume the catalogue of horrors
  • Universal jurisdiction in Canada: Time for the defense marathon
  •  

Click here to download the IJT, No. 81

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article
20 April 2011 by -

Mathias Bushishi (71), a former Rwandan prosecutor, was arrested in Belgium on Wednesday.

By Eerke Steller

He was picked up after Kigali issued an arrest warrant on charges of war crimes and genocide. Bushishi is being detained at the Forest prison in Brussels.

He had been living in the Belgian town of Laken since 2009 - and was even listed in the phonebook. On the list of Rwandan most wanted, Bushishi ranks as number 16.

article
09 December 2009 by -

A Brussels court has sentenced Rwandan Ephrem Nkezabera to 30 years in prison on charges of violating international criminal law and war crimes committed during his country’s 1994 genocide.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

Nkezabera was arrested in Belgium in 2004 under a warrant issued by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

Dubbed “the genocide banker”, Nkezabera admitted to arming and financing the Hutu militia which spearheaded the three-month massacre, and acknowledged funding an extremist radio station.

article
01 June 2001 by -

Factory director in Butare

Alphonse Higaniro was found guilty of violating international humanitarian law. He was sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment.
© Réseau Intermedia.

Identity

article
05 April 2004 by -

The former Rwandan officer Bernard Ntuyahaga, who was implicated in the death of ten Belgian peacekeepers in Kigali in April 1994, was freed by the Tanzanian courts on 27 March, 2004. On his release from prison, Ntuyahaga gave himself up to Belgian diplomats, and was transferred to Belgium. On the day of his arrival, the Brussels investigating magistrate Damien Vandermeersch charged him with violating international humanitarian law.

article
03 May 2004 by -

Nearly three years after convicting four Rwandans of taking part in the 1994 genocide, Belgium is preparing to try two more Rwandan suspects before the Brussels criminal court. Étienne Nzabonimana and Samuel Ndashikirwa, both businessmen in the Kibungo region, have been detained in Belgium since the end of 2002. Their trial is expected to start in the autumn. At the same time, the Brussels court has begun examining four other complaints.

article
10 October 2005 by -

Belgium issued an international arrest warrant on September 19 for former Chadian president Hissène Habré, 63, for crimes against humanity and torture. The information was revealed two weeks later. The warrant was issued by Brussels-based examining magistrate Daniel Fransen and accompanied by a request for immediate arrest. It was sent via Interpol to authorities in Senegal, where Habré took refuge after being ousted in 1990 following an 8-year reign.

article
11 July 2005 by -

The prosecutor requested life sentences; Etienne Nzabonimana and Samuel Ndashyikirwa were finally given 12 and 10 years, respectively. On 28 June, a jury of 12 sitting in the Brussels criminal court found the two businessmen guilty of war crimes and murders in the Kibungo region, in south-east Rwanda, where 50,000 people were massacred in April 1994 (see IJT-26-27-28). This was the second trial to be held in Belgium relating to the Rwandan genocide. In 2001, four other Rwandans were sentenced to between 12 and 20 years imprisonment.

article
11 July 2005 by -

The prosecutor requested life sentences; Etienne Nzabonimana and Samuel Ndashyikirwa were finally given 12 and 10 years, respectively. On 28 June, a jury of 12 sitting in the Brussels criminal court found the two businessmen guilty of war crimes and murders in the Kibungo region, in south-east Rwanda, where 50,000 people were massacred in April 1994 (see IJT-26-27-28). This was the second trial to be held in Belgium relating to the Rwandan genocide. In 2001, four other Rwandans were sentenced to between 12 and 20 years imprisonment.

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