bagosora

article
25 April 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

When the defence case in the military trial opened on 11 April before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), there was an inevitable feeling of vertigo. "The first word that springs to mind is: Finally! Eleven years after the crimes, nine years after his arrest, eight years and three months after his arrival in Arusha, Colonel Bagosora can finally begin to explain himself. Raphaël Constant, the lawyer for the most famous Rwandan genocide suspect, is one of only two people in the courtroom to have followed the lengthy proceedings against Théoneste Bagosora and his three co-accused from the start.

article
07 November 2005 by our correspondent in Arusha

Leading ICTR defendant Colonel Théoneste Bagosora began giving testimony on October 24 for the period leading up to the fateful date of April 6, 1994 - the day the Rwandan genocide began. The former directeur de cabinet in the Defense Ministry denied responsibility for disseminating a "definition of the Tutsi enemy" within the army in 1992. He especially denied being the colonel of the "apocalypse."

article
21 November 2005 by our correspondent in Arusha

On November 17, the most notorious defendant at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), Colonel Théoneste Bagosora, concluded his 17-day testimony. The former directeur de cabinet at the Rwandan Ministry of Defense shifted responsibility for the April 7, 1994 assassination of the Prime Minister and ten Belgian peacekeepers to UN mission commander General Roméo Dallaire.

article
21 May 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier and our correspondent in Arusha

From May 28 to June 1, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) will hear closing arguments from the Prosecutor and defense in its most important trial - that involving Colonel Théoneste Bagosora, the former Chef de Cabinet at the Ministry of Defense and the presumed architect of the 1994 genocide. The trial has centered around allegations that Bagosora led a conspiracy that planned the genocide well in advance of the killings. Now, after twelve years of investigation and more than five years of trial, what do we actually know?

issue
21 May 2007

End of the officers' trial: 13 years later, what proof?

From May 28 to June 1, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) will hear closing arguments from the Prosecutor and defense in its most important trial - that involving Colonel Théoneste Bagosora, the former Chef de Cabinet at the Ministry of Defense and the presumed architect of the 1994 genocide. The trial has centered around allegations that Bagosora led a conspiracy that planned the genocide well in advance of the killings. Now, after twelve years of investigation and more than five years of trial, what do we actually know?

Europe supports the ICC without fail and without zeal

Since its conception, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has found its most fervent supporters in Europe. No fewer than 20 European countries participated in the pro-ICC "like-minded group" of 58 during the Rome Statute negotiations in 1998. This diplomatic activism—rewarded by the election of judges from Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Ireland, Latvia and other European states to the permanent court—has continued unfailingly within the European Union (EU). However, on a practical level, the cooperation is less effective and relations with the ICC remain bilateral for the most part, just like relationships between States regarding universal jurisdiction cases.

Brief news:

• France: Judicial inquiry into Agathe Habyarimana

• ICC: Judge Jorda resigns

• ICTR: Controversy over the presidency

• Complicity in genocide: the double response from The Hague

• Tribunal for lebanon: to be passed by force?