article
07 February 2005 by PIERRE ABRAMOVICI

French investigating judge Sophie Clément could over the next few weeks order former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet to appear before the Paris criminal court for his alleged involvement in the disappearance of several French nationals in Chile and Argentina at the end of the 1970s (see IJT 14). The trial in absentia raises the question of the connection between France and Operation Condor, the joint effort by the South American military regimes to eliminate their political opponents.

article
05 November 2007 by Santiago O’Donnell

A growing number of loosely defined groups are being declared victims of genocide by Latin American and Spanish courts: Indians in the Brazilian Amazonia, victims of the Argentine junta, student demonstrators in Mexico, street protesters in Bolivia, and former guerrilla members in Colombia. Yet, this trend goes against the widely accepted United Nations Genocide Convention of 1948 and the legal definition of genocide used by all contemporary international or hybrid tribunals, which are much stricter about what constitutes a genocide.

article
13 January 2010 by -

Four senior officers of the Israel Defense Forces, scheduled to visit the United Kingdom this month, cancelled their trip at the last minute for fear of being arrested or indicted on arrival in the country. This follows the recent arrest warrant issued by a UK court against Israel’s former foreign minister, Tzipi Livni. The warrant focused on her role in Israel’s Gaza offensive last year.

By Vessola Evrova

article
10 February 2010 by Bram Posthumus

An international legal drama is playing itself out in the Senegalese capital Dakar, against the backdrop of the Monument for the African Renaissance. Main characters in no specific order: Hissène Habré, former president of the central African state of Chad, Abdoulaye Wade, president of Senegal, the African Union, Belgium, lawyers and human rights groups. At issue: can an African state put a former head of another African state on trial for crimes against humanity?

article
21 April 2010 by José Zepeda

Spanish judge Baltasar Garzón is facing prosecution, accused of overreaching his judicial powers when investigating atrocities committed during and after the country’s 1936-39 civil war. Retired Chilean judge Juan Guzmán Tapia, who worked closely with Garzón when prosecuting late Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, speaks of political games.

article
07 June 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

On 28 May 2004, the Santiago court of appeal stripped former military leader Augusto Pinochet of his immunity from prosecution. If the Chilean Supreme Court confirms this ruling, the 88-year old ex-dictator could stand trial for his part in Operation Condor, a coordinated campaign in the 1970s by several Latin American military dictatorships to assassinate hundreds of suspected opponents.

article
20 September 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

The tide seems to have turned for former South American dictators. Argentina's Supreme Court has just accepted the imprescriptibility of a crime against humanity, while in Chile a trial looks likely for Augusto Pinochet after the former dictator was stripped of his immunity on 26 August.

article
13 June 2005 by MYRIAM HERNANDEZ

On 7 June, former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet had a day of victory and defeat. The victory was the Santiago appeal court's decision to end proceedings against him and his former interior minister, retired General Cesar Benavides, on charges relating to the repression of political opponents as part of Operation Condor. The defeat came from the plenary hearing at the same court, which lifted his political immunity in the case of the millions of dollars deposited in Riggs Bank in Washington, DC.

article
25 July 2005 by Franck Petit

Following Spain, Belgium and France, Britain is the fourth European country this year to try a non-national in a case of universal jurisdiction. In the first trial of its kind to be heard in England, an Afghan warlord, Farayadi Sarwar Zardad, 42, was convicted of torture committed in his home country before the Old Bailey criminal court in London. He was given a 20-year prison sentence on 19 July.

article
10 October 2005 by ARNAUD GRELLIER

Juan Guzman Tapia retired from the magistracy in May 2005. During his career, he prepared hundreds of cases against ex-dictator Augusto Pinochet filed by families of disappeared persons in Chile. On a visit to Paris to promote his autobiography "Aboard the World," he spoke to IJT.

Pages

Augusto Pinochet