1994 genocide

article
04 October 2004 by our correspondent

After the 1994 Rwandan genocide, few people would have believed that two officers with such contrasting profiles would find themselves in a joint billing at the Arusha court. Yet since September 20, and accompanied by two other high-level officers from the ex-Rwandan Armed Forces (FAR), Generals Augustin Ndindiliyimana and Augustin Bizimungu have appeared side by side before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). 

article
21 January 2007 by our correspondent in Arusha

Two years before the official end of its mandate, one of the priori-ties of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is to settle all the cases. On December 14, Joseph Nzabirinda took advantage of this favorable context and signed a mini-mum agreement concerning his guilt in the 1994 genocide. The prosecutor dropped the main charges against this former youth leader in exchange for Nzabirinda’s acknowledgement that he was an “approving spectator” of the massacre of Tutsis. On January 17, the judges will decide if they agree with the suggested sentence of 5 to 8 years in prison.

article
25 May 2011 by Thierry Cruvellier and Franck Petit

Four senior officers of the Rwandan army were convicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on 17 May for crimes committed during the genocide in 1994. But in the case of the former chief of staff of the Gendarmerie Augustin Ndindiliyimana, the sentencing clearly exposed the damage done by one of the tribunal’s worst failings: a preventive detention that went out of control. 

article
05 May 2010 by Koert Lindijer

“I am the victim of a politically-motivated slander campaign by Rwanda’s dictatorial government,” says Pierre-Claver Karangwa. This former major in the Rwandan army is being accused of participating in the 1994 genocide in his home country.

article
05 July 2004 by our correspondent

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

article
11 April 2008 by J. COLL METCALFE

As she makes her way down the hill to the field she is preparing for planting, Anastasia Mukaruteke greets her neighbors with smiles. It is only when they are out of earshot that Anastasia drops the facade. "Killers, every one of them," she says. "Some of them even killed my family, but I pretend not to know because I don't want any trouble."

article
21 February 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

Every year, the run-up to the annual commemoration of the Rwandan genocide that began on April 1994, generates a flurry of legal activity. This year is no different, with a number of complaints lodged last year continuing or being repeated in 2005. Last week in Spain and France, NGOs from opposing political camps announced they were filing new complaints, while in Rwanda, the start of the gacaca trials is now set for March.

article
25 April 2005 by Mary Kimani

Within two weeks of Gacaca restarting its operations in March, three of the community courts have summoned three high Rwandan dignitaries - Prime Minister Bernard Makuza, Minister of Defense General Marcel Gatsinzi, and the prefect of Ruhengeri province in northern Rwanda, Boniface Rucagu - to answer charges relating to the 1994 genocide. Gatsinzi and Rucagu are directly accused of taking part in the genocide. The appearance of these important Hutu officials, who became members of the governing Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), has sparked debate. Some see it as the determination of ordinary Rwandans to prise answers from everyone, even from prominent Hutus who have been successfully integrated into the government. Others see it as a ploy to tarnish the reputation of the few remaining Hutu leaders.

article
24 October 2005 by Louis-Martin Rugendo

"Those who say we are in bondage are wrong. They forget the nature of the crimes we committed! They have been lenient with us," says Emmanuel Kamanda with conviction. Assigned to the second category of genocide perpetrators by his sector gacaca, he was sentenced to 12 years in prison. Kamanda has finished serving height and will perform community service to fulfill the remaining four. He is among the hundreds of people we met at a pilot site in the center of the country. They were crushing rocks to build roads.

article
08 May 2006 by our correspondent in Arusha

On the foggy day of September 20, 2004, the public gallery at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) was packed. It was the first time that a priest from the powerful Rwandan Catholic church was appearing before the ICTR. However, Father Athanase Seromba kept the crowds waiting. He boycotted the trial for a week to protest the negotiations between the ICTR and Rwanda on transferring cases. On April 27, 2006, his trial ended in a similarly fruitless confrontation, consummating what had seemed to be the unlikely symbolic trial of the Church's role in Rwanda in 1994.

Pages