Will Ukraine get a fairytale ending in The Hague?

06 February 2017 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Ukraine and Russia will face off before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) from March 6 to 9 over so-called provisional measures against Russia to “prevent further aggravation or extension of the disputes between the parties” requested by Ukraine. Among the measures demanded by Kiev is that Russia cracks down on border security to prevent acts of terrorism financing, including the supply of weapons to pro-Russian militias.  

Wreckage recovery of flight MH17 November 2014 (Photo: Dutch Ministry of Defence/ Dutch Safety Board)
Image caption: 
Wreckage recovery of flight MH17 November 2014 (Photo: Dutch Ministry of Defence/ Dutch Safety Board)

In their filing to the UN's highest court of January 16, Ukraine specifically names the shooting down of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 as an alleged example of how Russia funded terrorist attacks by pro-Russian forces in Ukraine breaching their obligations under the 2002 Terrorism Financing Convention. Ukraine's claim before the ICJ could see the first time an international court is asked to rule on the circumstances of the 2014 attack on MH17 which left 298 people dead. The International Criminal Court (ICC) is also opened a preliminary examination in 2014 into events in Ukraine and especially the Crimea crisis but has not launched an official investigation yet. 

Want to read more?

We have tailor-made memberships for students, individuals, groups of professionals and large companies and organizations. A subscription entitles you to receive the International Justice Tribune every two weeks as well as become a member of the Justice Tribune Foundation, supporting independent reporting on international justice.

Subscribe now

Related articles

article
21 December 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Being the ICC's Chief Prosecutor is a delicate and politically sensitivejob.ForLuisMorenoOcampo it has been "the best job in the world." Fatou Bensouda will be taking over his office in June. She inhe

article
07 December 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

December 7, 2011 Ivory Coast is the latest playgroundoftheInternationalCriminal Court. This week the courtroom in The Hague became its theatre of justice. Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo proudly p

article
07 December 2011 by Richard Walker

Four Congolese witnesses testifying at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, find themselves caught in a legal wrangle, which could at once set a legal precedent and make them the last

article
07 December 2011 by Lindy Janssen

Brazil is booming. The economy is expanding and the country is getting ready to host the Football World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016. But the Latin American giant has not even begun dealing wi

article
07 December 2011 by Radosa Milutinovic

The primary purpose of the retrial of Ramush Haradinaj, as proclaimed by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in its appeal judgement in July, should have been to hear testimonies of two "key" witnesses who proved unwilling to testify in the original trial in 2007. Almost four months into the retrial which started in mid-August, its stated aim has not yet been achieved.