ICTY exposes the gap between individual criminal justice and the writing of history

24 May 2016 by Joost van Egmond

“Finally, good news from The Hague!” famously cried the then Serbian prime minister Ivica Dacic at the acquittal on appeal of former Yugoslav army commander Momcilo Perisic by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. For him, and for the government he represented, this counted as vindication of Belgrade’s actions during the war. The fact that Serbia as a state had already been held partly responsible by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) for the very crimes this individual was tried for, was swept under the carpet [IJT-63].

Bosnian victims protesting outside the ICTY during the Karadzic judgement. The banner reads: 'Truth sometimes sleeps but never dies' (Photo: Joost van Egmond)
Image caption: 
Bosnian victims protesting outside the ICTY during the Karadzic judgement. The banner reads: 'Truth sometimes sleeps but never dies' (Photo: Joost van Egmond)

--This story is the second in a series of four IJT articles focused on the legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ahead of the special debate “Coming to a close. Trials and tribulations of the Yugoslavia war-crimes tribunal jointly hosted by the Dutch NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and International Justice Tribune which will be held in Amsterdam on 31 May. For more information on the debate and speakers and to register click here.--

 

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